DISC-CSSRR Blog

May 23, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–May 23, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 3:50 pm

Center for Family and Demographic Research [Bowling Green State University] Working Paper: “Parental Incarceration and Well-Being in Adolescence And Young Adulthood: A Life Course Perspective on Social Learning,” by Peggy C. Giordano, Jennifer E. Copp, Wendy D. Manning, and Monica A. Longmore (WP-2017-05, May 2017, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

Children who have experienced parental incarceration face numerous additional disadvantages, but most studies of effects on child behavior and well-being treat these coexisting factors primarily as controls. This article focuses direct conceptual and empirical attention on a broader range of family dynamics, including parents’ antisocial behavior, that are potentially important to a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms underlying previously observed incarceration effects. We develop a life course perspective on social learning as a conceptual framework, and examine the role of parent/family antisociality and specific parenting practices as well as traditional factors such as economic hardship likely to vary with parental incarceration. Analyses rely on survey and qualitative data from a longitudinal study of the adolescent and young adult periods (Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study). Respondents whose parents’ backgrounds included incarceration faced greater odds of juvenile and adult arrest, failure to graduate high school, and higher levels of adult depressive symptoms. Nevertheless, after introduction of the broader set of family and economic indicators, parental incarceration was significant only as a predictor of low educational attainment. Analyses of in-depth interviews with youths whose parents had experienced parental incarceration also supported the need to consider the broader family context, and contributed to an understanding of underlying mechanisms. Findings suggest that to maximize the potential benefits of efforts to reduce current levels of incarceration, it will be important to develop policies/programs that simultaneously address problems that are often closely linked to the parent’s criminal justice contact (e.g., providing broader access to high quality drug treatment).

www.bgsu.edu…

CSSRR Economics/Sociology–May 23, 2017

Filed under: E. Working Papers,Economics,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 3:47 pm

Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) [University of Essex, Colchester, UK] Working Paper: “Interviewer effects and the measurement of financial literacy,” by Thomas F. Crossley, Tobias Schmidt, Panagiota Tzamourani, and Joachim K. Winter (ISER Working Paper 2017-06, May 2017, .pdf format, 28p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.iser.essex.ac.uk…

May 22, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–May 22, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of May 22, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23411-23437.

Health related: 23413, 23430.

Sociology related: 23412, 23421, 23435, 23437.

May 19, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–May 19, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10753-10772.

Health related: 10765.

Sociology related: 10758, 10771.

CSSRR Economics/Sociology–May 19, 2017

Filed under: E. Working Papers,Economics,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 3:43 pm

Luxembourg Institute of Socio-Economic Research [LISER] Working Papers:

A. “Childcare, maternal employment and residential location,” by Audrey Bousslein (Working Paper No. 2017-05, April 2017, .pdf format, 56p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.liser.lu…

B. “Gender Differences in Unemployment Dynamics and Initial Wages over the Business Cycle,” by Amparo Nagore Garcia (Working Paper No. 2017-06, April 2017, .pdf format, 40p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.liser.lu…

May 17, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–May 17, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:00 pm

Max Planck Institute of Demographic Research Working Paper: “A new approach to understanding the socio-economic determinants of fertility over the life course,” by Maarten J. Bijlsma and Ben Wilson (WP-2017-013, May 2017, .pdf format, 29p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/a_new_approach_to_understanding_the_socio_economic_determinants_of_fertility_over_the_life_course__5840.htm…

May 16, 2017

CSSRR Health/Sociology–May 16, 2017

Filed under: H. Working Papers,Health,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 3:58 pm

University of Wisconsin Center for Demography and Ecology Working Paper: “Gradual Change or Punctuated Equilibrium? Reconsidering Patterns of Health in Later-Life,” by Michal Engelman and Heide Jackson (2017-01, May 2017, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines the curious mismatch between the supposition of gradual, continuous change embedded in common health trajectory models and a pattern of punctuated stability that is captured in the nationally-representative and widely-used Health and Retirement Study. Inspired by an insight from evolutionary biology, our analysis contrasts the conclusions drawn from mixed regression methods (growth curve models and latent class growth analysis) designed to capture trajectories in repeated-measure data with methods (multistate life tables and sequence analysis) designed to describe discrete states and transition patterns. Although a gradually increasing number of functional limitations is consistent with prevailing notions of health decline, our ndings suggest that later life functional health, as captured in survey data, is more aptly characterized as a punctuated equilibrium: long-term stability that is irregularly interrupted by changes in health status or mortality. We conclude by discussing the implications of a punctuated equilibrium model
for studies of health and aging.

www.ssc.wisc.edu…

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–May 16, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of May 15, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23395-23410.

Health related: 23402, 23403.

Sociology related: 23395, 23408.

May 12, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–May 12, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of May 8, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23376-23394.

Health related: 23376, 23388, 23389, 23392.

Sociology related: 23380, 23390, 23392, 23393.

May 11, 2017

CSSRR Health/Sociology–May 11, 2017

Filed under: H. Working Papers,Health,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 3:59 pm

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Papers:

A. “Family organisation and human capital inequalities in historic Europe: testing the association anew,” by Mikolaj Szoltysek, Radoslaw Poniat, Sebastian Klüsener, and Siegfried Gruber (WP-2017-012, May 2017, .pdf format, 40p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/family_organisation_and_human_capital_inequalities_in_historic_europe_testing_the_association_anew_5841.htm…

B. “Urban and rural fertility transitions in the developing world: a cohort perspective,” by Mathias Lerch (WP-2017-011, May 2017, .pdf format, 26p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/urban_and_rural_fertility_transitions_in_the_developing_world_a_cohort_perspective_5830.htm…

C. “An ordinal measure of population health,” by Hector Pifarre i Arolas and Christian Dudel (WP-2017-010, May 2017, .pdf format, 27p.). Note: Links to
the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/an_ordinal_measure_of_population_health_5836.htm…

May 8, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–May 8, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:13 pm

Vienna Institute of Demography Working Paper: “Potential Implications of China’s ‘One Belt, One Road’ Strategies on Chinese International Migration,” by Raya Muttarak (VID Working Paper 5/2017, May 2017, .pdf format, 14p.).

Abstract:

Along with the flows of China’s foreign direct investment following the newly implemented ‘One Belt, One Road’ strategy by the Chinese government will likely generate movements of state employees, entrepreneurs, workers and accompanying family members to respective countries along the Belt and Road. It is not clear how large Chinese migration flows into these countries will be, who they are, how the public reception of the host society will be and how well the migrants will be integrated in the destination country. Based on extant data and literature on current Chinese migration, this paper describes
trends and patterns of recent Chinese migration in Africa and Asia, analyses host country public perceptions on China and investigates integration patterns of Chinese migrants. Given that the ‘One Belt, One Road’ strategy has only been officially endorsed in 2015, it is still early to analyse its impacts on Chinese migration in the respective countries. Considering earlier Chinese overseas migration in the past decades, this paper presents potential migration and integration patterns one may expect following the Belt and Road initiative.

www.oeaw.ac.at/fileadmin/subsites/Institute/VID/PDF/Publications/Working_Papers/WP2017_05.pdf…

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–May 8, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10742–10752.

Economics related: 10749-10752

Health related: 10744-10746

Sociology related: 10742, 10743, 10747, 10748

May 2, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–May 2, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:05 pm

Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) [University of Essex, Colchester, UK] Working Paper: “Completing web surveys on mobile devices: does screen size affect data quality?” by Alexander Wenz (ISER Working Paper 2017-05, April 2017, .pdf format, 23p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.iser.essex.ac.uk…

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Paper: “Trends in gender differences in health and mortality at working ages among West and East Germans,” by Mine Kuhn, Christian Dudel, Tobias Vogt, and Anna Oksuzyan (WP-2017-009, April 2017, .pdf format, 21p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/trends_in_gender_differences_in_health_and_mortality_at_working_ages_among_west_and_east_germans_5829.htm…

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University of Michigan Population Studies Center Working Papers:

A. “Trends in Voting in South Africa 2003-2014,” by Mosidi Nhlapo, Barbara A. Anderson, and Marie Wentzel PSC Research Report No. 17-881, April 2017, .pdf format, 23p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.psc.isr.umich.edu…

B. “Spatial Aspects of the American “Culture War”: The Two Dimensions of US Family Demography and the Presidential Elections, 1968-2016,” by Ron J. Lesthaeghe and Lisa Niedert (PSC Research Report No. 17-880, April 2017, .pdf format, 24p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.psc.isr.umich.edu…

May 1, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–May 1, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10703-10741.

Health related: 10715, 10735, 10739.

Sociology related: 10707, 10709, 10712, 10714, 10716, 10740.

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National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of May 1, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23344-23375.

Health related: 23344, 23353, 23366, 23372.

Sociology related: 23360, 23371, 23374.

April 25, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–April 25, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10687-10702.

Health related: 10691.

Sociology related: 10687, 10697, 10701.

April 21, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–April 21, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:16 pm

Center for Family and Demographic Research [Bowling Green State University] Working Papers:

A. “Better Late than Never? Post-Conception Union Formation and Stability,” by Karen Benjamin Guzzo (Working Paper 2017-04, 2017, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Union formation following a non-union conception, and the stability of such unions, has received substantial research attention, as has union formation following a nonmarital birth. Yet work has rarely considered simultaneously the full spectrum of union formation behaviors following a non-union conception – forming a union before or after birth with the other biological parent or with a new partner – and these variations are almost certainly associated with union stability. In this paper, I use several waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 (NLSY97) to analyze the likelihood of union formation among individuals with a first birth that was conceived outside of a coresidential union (N = 2,251), with attention to timing (pre- vs. post-birth) and partnership type (biological parent vs. new partner), and analyze subsequent union stability. The majority of mothers and fathers formed a coresidential union, with 29% forming a union prior to birth (12% of which are with a new partner) and 50% forming a union after birth (more than half of which are with the other biological parent). All unions formed after a conception are fairly unstable, but those formed prior to birth with the child’s other biological parent are least likely to dissolve, whereas those formed prior to birth with a new partner are most likely to dissolve. Further, timing matters – unions formed with the child’s other parent are more stable when formed prior to birth than after the birth. The results have implications for both policy and child well-being.

www.bgsu.edu…

B. “The “Distal Determinants” of Fertility Identifying Underlying Constructs and Examining Race-Ethnic Variation,” by Karen Benjamin Guzzo, Sarah R. Hayford, Vanessa Wanner Lang, Hsueh-Sheng Wu, Jennifer Barber, and Yasamin Kusunoki (Working Paper 2017-03, 2017, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

The proximate causes of unintended fertility are clear. But the more distal factors that predict unprotected sex among those who do not want to conceive, and the uneven distribution of this behavior across race-ethnicity, are not well understood. In this paper, we propose that attitudinal indicators and reproductive knowledge measures that have been shown to be individually associated with unintended fertility can be drawn together under the umbrella concepts of fertility motivation and reproductive knowledge and may be useful in explaining race-ethnic variation in reproductive behaviors. We test this approach by applying multi-group confirmatory factor analysis drawing on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health. For both fertility motivation and reproductive knowledge, a three-construct factorial pattern best fit the data, but the structure of the patterns varied across race-ethnic groups. The results suggest that the factors identified for the full sample function differently across race-ethnicity and should not be used to explain race-ethnic variation in behavior.

www.bgsu.edu…

April 19, 2017

CSSRR Health/Sociology–April 19, 2017

Filed under: H. Working Papers,Health,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:06 pm

California Center for Population Research [University of California-Los Angeles] Working Paper: “The Impact of Obesity on Adult Mortality: Assessment of Estimates with Applications,” by Alberto Palloni and Hiram Beltran-Sanchez (CCPR-2017-006, April 2017, .pdf format, 22p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

papers.cc…

April 11, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–April 11, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 3:54 pm

California Center for Population Research [University of California-Los Angeles] Working Papers:

A. “Ancestry and Development: New Evidence,” by Enrico Spolaore and Romain Wacziarg (CCPR-2017-004, April 2017, .pdf format, 18p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

papers.cc…

B. “The Political Economy of Heterogeneity and Conflict,” by Enrico Spolaore and Romain Wacziarg (CCPR-2017-003, April 2017, .pdf format, 34p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

papers.cc…

C. “Instrumental Variables and Causal Mechanisms: Unpacking the Effect of Trade on Workers and Voters,” by Christian Dippel, Robert Gold, Stephan Heblich, and Rodrigo Pinto (CCPR-2017-002, April 2017, .pdf format, 67p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

papers.cc…

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–April 11, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10649-10686.

Health related: 10649.

Sociology related: 10661-10663, 10674-10679, 10685, 10686.

April 10, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–April 10, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10600-10648.

Health related: 10618, 10620, 10628.

Sociology related: 10600, 10603, 10622, 10625, 10626, 10627, 10629, 10630.

April 7, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–April 7, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 3:25 pm

California Center for Population Research [University of California-Los Angeles] Working Paper: “Loss Aversion and Duration of Residence,” by Phillip S. Morrison and William A.V. Clark (CCPR-2017-001, March 2017, .pdf format, 25p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

papers.cc…

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Center for Research on Child Wellbeing [Princeton University] Working Papers:

A. “Schools as Surveilling Institutions? Parental Incarceration, System Avoidance, and Parental Involvement in Schooling,” by Anna Haskins and Wade Jacobsen (WP17-02-FF, April 2017, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:
Parents play important roles in their children’s lives, and parental involvement in elementary schooling in particular is meaningful for a range of child outcomes. Given the increasing number of school-aged children with incarcerated parents, this study explores the ways paternal incarceration is associated with mothers’ and fathers’ reports of home- and school-based involvement in schooling. Using Fragile Families Study data, findings suggest that a father’s incarceration inhibits his school- and home-based involvement in schooling, while associations for maternal involvement are weaker. Results are robust to alternative specifications of incarceration that address concerns about selection and unobserved heterogeneity. Findings also hold when teachers’ reports are substituted, and across levels of father-child contact. Lastly, a test of the system avoidance mechanism is conducted, and results suggest it partially explains reductions in school involvement for fathers following incarceration. Given the reoccurring interest in the interconnection between families and schools and how this translates into success, this study suggests that paternal incarceration is associated with lower parental involvement in schooling and highlights the role of system avoidance in this association. Attachment to social institutions like schools is quite consequential, and this work highlights another way mass incarceration influences social life in the US.

crcw.princeton.edu…

B. “Punishment and Inequality at an Early Age: Exclusionary Discipline in Elementary School,” by Wade Jacobsen, Garrett Pace, and Nayan Ramirez (WP16-04-FF, February 2017, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

We fill an important gap in prior research by assessing (1) the prevalence of exclusionary discipline in elementary school; (2) racial disparities in exclusionary discipline in elementary school; and (3) the association between exclusionary discipline and aggressive behavior in elementary school. Using the Fragile Families Study, we estimate that more than 1 in 10 children born 1998-2000 in large US cities were suspended or expelled by age nine (most in third grade). We also find extreme racial disparity; upwards of 30% of non-Hispanic black males were suspended or expelled, compared to 8% of non-Hispanic white or other-race males. Disparities are largely due to differences in children’s school and home environments rather than to behavior problems. Furthermore, we find suspension or expulsion associated with increased aggressive behavior in elementary school. These results are robust to a rich set of covariates, within-individual fixed-effects, matching methods, and sensitivity checks for reverse causality and selection. Our results imply that school discipline policies relying heavily on exclusionary punishment may be fostering childhood inequality.

crcw.princeton.edu…

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Papers:

A. “Does the age difference between partners influence the career achievements of women?” by Anna Oksuzyan, Angela Carollo, Sven Drefahl, Carlo Giovanni Camarda, Kaare Christensen, and Alyson van Raalte (WP-2017-008, March 2017, .pdf format, 28p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/does_the_age_difference_between_partners_influence_the_career_achievements_of_women_5763.htm…

B. “A cause-of-death decomposition of the young adult mortality hump,” by Adrien Remund, Carlo G. Camarda and Tim Riffe (WP-2017-007, March 2017, .pdf format, 21p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/a_cause_of_death_decomposition_of_the_young_adult_mortality_hump_5759.htm…

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University of Michigan Population Studies Center Working Paper: “Family Support for Older Persons in Thailand: Challenges and Opportunities,” by John E. Knodel and Bussarawan Teerawichitchainan (PSC Research Report No. 17-879, March 2017, .pdf format, 25p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.psc.isr.umich.edu…

April 2, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–April 2, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of March 27, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23264-23288.

Health related: 23269, 23271.

Sociology related: 23265, 23275, 23284.

March 17, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–March 17, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:23 pm

Vienna Institute of Demography Working Papers:

A. “Fertility Desires, Intentions and Behaviour: A Comparative Analysis of Their Consistency,” by Rita Freitas and Maria Rita Testa (VID Working Paper 4/2017, 2017, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Realisation of childbearing intentions implies couple’s dyadic interaction and proceptive behaviour. Studies on childbearing intentions and outcomes have rarely considered non-use of contraception or ‘proceptive behaviour’ in general as an important mediator of fertility outcomes. The traits-­–desires-­–intentions-­–behaviour theory (Miller and Pasta, 1996; Miller et al., 2004; Miller, 2010) expects proceptive behaviour to be the most accurate predictor of a birth and intentions to be more predictive than desires. We test this theory using longitudinal data from the Generations and Gender Surveys from Austria, France and Bulgaria (2004–2013) and performing logistic regression models on birth outcomes which includes as key explanatory variables different pairwise combinations of desires, intentions and contraceptive (or proceptive) behaviour. The findings show that an individual’s intention to have a child predicts the birth of a child better than non-use of contraception, or proceptive behaviour; however, proceptive behaviour is a better predictor of a birth than non-­–use of contraception. Finally, perception of the partner’s agreement on having a child now is less predictive than an individual’s intention to have a child within three years. This paper calls for the collection of genuine couple-level data on fertility intentions and behaviour and more refined measures on both contraceptive and proceptive behaviour.

www.oeaw.ac.at/fileadmin/subsites/Institute/VID/PDF/Publications/Working_Papers/WP2017_04.pdf…

B. “Cohort fertility decline in low fertility countries: decomposition using parity progression ratios,” by Krystof Zeman, Eva Beaujouan, Zuzanna Brzozowska and Tomas Sobotka (VID Working Paper 3/2017, 2017, .pdf format, 39p.).

www.oeaw.ac.at/fileadmin/subsites/Institute/VID/PDF/Publications/Working_Papers/WP2017_03_HFDRR.pdf…

March 14, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–March 14, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of March 6, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23209, 23220-23243.

Health related: 23239, 23241.

Sociology related: 23230, 23232.

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10588-10599.

Health related: 10590, 10591, 10592.

Sociology related: 10588, 10596.

CSSRR Sociology–March 14, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 3:54 pm

Maryland Population Research Center [University of Maryland] Working Paper: “Racial Disparities in Residential Mobility and Long-term Population Displacement from New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina,” by Michael S. Rendall, Narayan Sastry, and Lori Reeder (MPRC-2017-001, February 2017, .pdf format, 53p). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

papers.cc…

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Paper: “Formation and realisation of moving intentions across the adult life course,” by Lars Dommermuth and Sebastian Klusener (WP-2017-06, March 2017, .pdf format, 27p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/formation_and_realisation_of_moving_intentions_across_the_adult_life_course_5751.htm…

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Program on the Global Demography of Aging [Harvard University] Working Paper: “Legal Status and Deprivation in India’s Urban Slums: An Analysis of Two Decades of National Sample Survey Data,” by Laura B. Nolan, David E. Bloom, and Ramnath Subbaraman (PGDA Working Paper No. 135, February 2017, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

In India, 52–98 million people live in urban slums, and 59% of slums are “non-notified” or lack legal recognition by the government. In this paper, we use data on 2,901 slums from four waves of the National Sample Survey (NSS) spanning almost 20 years to test the hypothesis that non-notified status is associated with greater deprivation in access to basic services, thereby increasing vulnerability to poor health outcomes. To quantify deprivation for each slum, we construct a basic services deprivation score (BSDS), which includes variables that affect health, such as access to piped water, latrines, solid waste disposal, schools, and health centers. In a regression analysis, we find a robust association between non-notified status and greater deprivation after controlling for other variables. Our analysis reveals a progressive reduction in deprivation the longer a slum has been notified. In addition, data from the 2012 NSS show that, despite suffering from greater deprivation, non-notified slums were much less likely to receive financial aid from government slum improvement schemes. Our findings suggest that legally recognizing non-notified slums and targeting government aid to these settlements may be crucial for improving health outcomes and diminishing urban disparities.

cdn1.sph.harvard.edu…

March 6, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–March 6, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of March 6, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23206-23219.

Health related: 23215, 23218, 23219.

Sociology related: 23215, 23218.

CSSRR Health/Sociology–March 6, 2017

Filed under: H. Working Papers,Health,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:54 pm

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Paper: “Sex differences in genetic associations with longevity in Han Chinese: sex-stratified genome-wide association study and polygenic risk score analysis,” by Yi Zeng, Huashuai Chen, Xiaomin Liu, Rui Ye, Enjun Xie, Zhihua Chen, Jiehua Lu, Jianxin Li, Yaohua Tian, Ting Ni, Lars Bolund, Kenneth C. Land, Anatoliy Yashin, Angela M O’Rand, Liang Sun, Ze Yang, Wei Tao, Anastasia Gurinovich, Claudio Franceschi, Jichun Xie, Jun Gu, Yong Hou, Xiao Liu, Xun Xu, Jean-Marie Robine, Joris Deelen, Paola Sebastiani, Eline Slagboom, Thomas Perls, Elizabeth Hauser, William Gottschalk, Qihua Tan, Kaare Christensen, Mike Lutz, Xiao-Li Tian, Huanming Yang, Junxia Min, Chao Nie and James Vaupel (WP-2017-04, February 2017, .pdf format, 37p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/sex_differences_in_genetic_associations_with_longevity_in_han_chinese_sex_stratified_genome_wide_5734.htm…

March 1, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–March 1, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 5:12 pm

California Center for Population Research [University of California-Los Angeles] Working Paper: “Loss Aversion and Duration of Residence,” by Philip S. Morrison and William A. V. Clark (CCPR-2016-046, February 2017, .pdf format, 25p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

papers.cc…

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Paper: “Fertility postponement could reduce child mortality: evidence from 228 demographic and health surveys covering 77 developing countries,” by Mikko Myrskyla and Kieron Barcla (WP-2017-005, February 2017, .pdf format, 39p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/fertility_postponement_could_reduce_child_mortality_evidence_from_228_demographic_and_health_5748.htm…

CSSRR Economics/Sociology–March 1, 2017

Filed under: E. Working Papers,Economics,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 5:09 pm

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10541-10587.

Sociology related: 10543, 10560, 10569, 10586.

February 27, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–February 27, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Feb. 27, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23183-23205.

Health related: 23188,23192, 23203.

Sociology related: 23193, 23195.

February 20, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–February 20, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Feb. 20, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23169-23187.

Health related: 23171, 23174.

Sociology related: 23173, 23178.

February 14, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–February 14, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Feb. 13, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23138-23168.

Health related: 23139, 23148, 23150, 23166.

Sociology related: 23144, 23159.

February 7, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–February 7, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:44 pm

Research Institute for Quantitative Studies in Economics and Population [McMaster University] Working Paper: “Immigration And The Rate Of Population Mixing: Explorations With A Stylized Model,” by Frank T. Denton and Byron G. Spencer (QSEP Research Report No. 460, December 2016, .pdf format, 22p.).

Abstract:

Immigrants can mix with the population of a receiving country in various ways. We consider demographic mixing by which we mean cross-mating, and more particularly the bearing of children where one parent is of immigrant descent and the other is not – cross-parenting as we term it. We consider a hypothetical country with an initial stable population and introduce immigration. The results of cross-parenting are taken into account by identifying three separate populations within the overall total: non-immigrant population, immigrant population (immigrants and their descendants), and mixed population. We develop a stylized model to track the three populations, with interest focusing in particular on how the proportion of mixed population changes through time as it moves toward a steady state. The model has a stable projection (Leslie) matrix that holds for all three populations and moves them forward from generation to generation as each evolves in its own way. As cross-parenting occurs the resulting progeny are transferred from the other populations to the mixed population. The pattern of cross-parenting is determined in the first instance by a matrix representing preferences among the three populations and alternative preferential patterns are experimented with, ranging from complete isolation to indifference as to cross-parenting choices. However the matrix must be modified to recognize supply constraints imposed by the sizes of the available populations and a restricted least-squares procedure is employed to effect the modification while remaining as close as possible to the original preference pattern. Alternative rates of immigration are experimented with also.

socserv.mcmaster.ca…

February 6, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–February 6, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10508-10540.

Health related: 10524.

Sociology related: 10522, 10538.

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National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Feb. 6, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23117-23137.

Health related: 23117, 23131.

Sociology related: 23118, 23122.

CSSRR Economics/Sociology–February 6, 2017

Filed under: E. Working Papers,Economics,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 5:17 pm

John F. Kennedy School of Government [Harvard University] Working Paper: “The Labor of Division: Returns to Compulsory High School Math Coursework,” by Joshua Goodman (RWP17-005, February 2017, .pdf format, 48p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

research.hks.harvard.edu…

January 31, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–January 31, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:59 pm

Center for Family and Demographic Research [Bowling Green State University] Working Paper: “When Worlds Collide: The Role of Friendships in the Development and Management of Intimate Partner Conflicts During Emerging Adulthood,” by Jennifer E. Coop, Peggy C. Giordano, Monica A. Longmore and Wendy D. Manning (Working Paper 2017-02, January 2017, .pdf format, 40p.). Note: There is no abstract for this paper.

www.bgsu.edu…

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Paper: “Educational gain in cause-speci?c mortality: accounting for confounders,” by Govert E. Bijwaard, Mikko Myrskyla, Per Tynelius and Finn Rasmussen (WP-2017-03, January 2017, .pdf format, 35p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/educational_gain_in_cause_specic_mortality_accounting_for_confounders_5733.htm…

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National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research [CALDER] Working Papers:

A. “Building Better Bridges to Life After High School: Experimental Evidence on Contemporary Career Academies,” by Steven Hemelt, Matthew Lenard, and Colleen Paeplow (Working Paper 176, January 2017, .pdf format, 46p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.ca…

B. “What Factors Predict Middle School Students Sign Up for Washington’s College Bound Scholarship Program? A Mixed Methods Evaluation,” by Dan Goldhaber, Mark C. Long, Ann E. Person, and Jordan Rooklyn (Working Paper 175, January 2017, .pdf format, 58p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.ca…

C. “Long-Term Orientation and Educational Performance,” by David Figlio, Paola Giuliano, Umut Ozek, and Paola Sapienza (Working Paper 174, January 2017, .pdf format, 74p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.ca…

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University of Michigan Population Studies Center Working Paper: “Time and Effort: A Second Look at Family Reciprocity by Older Singaporeans,” by Lois M. Verbrugge and Shannon Ang (PSC Research Report No. 17-877, January 2017, .pdf format, 27p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.psc.isr.umich.edu…

January 30, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–January 30, 2017

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Jan. 30, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23090-23116.

Health related: 23090, 23092, 23094, 23100, 23104, 23107.

Sociology related: 23096, 23111.

CSSRR Economics/Sociology–January 30, 2017

Filed under: E. Working Papers,Economics,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:50 pm

Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) [University of Essex, Colchester, UK] Working Paper: “Lone parents, time-limited in-work credits and the dynamics of work and welfare,” by Mike Brewer and Jonathan Cribb (ISER Working Paper 2017-01, January 2017, .pdf format, 48p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.iser.essex.ac.uk…

January 24, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–January 24, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 5:20 pm

Center for Family and Demographic Research [Bowling Green State University] Working Paper: “Serial Cohabitation in Young Adulthood: Baby Boomers to Millennials,” by Wendy D. Manning and Kasey J. Eickmeyer (WP2017-01. January 2017, .pdf format, 30p.).

Abstract:

During young adulthood, marriage is delayed and cohabitation is a common union experience (Manning, Brown, and Payne, 2014). One implication of this relationship context is the opportunity for serial cohabitation (multiple cohabiting unions). Drawing on data from the National Survey of Family Growth Cycle 6 (2002) and continuous 2006-2013 interview cycles, the authors find that among women at risk for serial cohabitation, this experience is increasing with half of Baby Boomers, born between 1960-1964, and three-fifths of Millennials, born 1980-1984, serially cohabiting. The demographic predictors of serial cohabitation have not changed between these two cohorts, suggesting that traditional indicators of disadvantage may not be operating in line with previous research even while serial cohabitors have become more demographically diverse. Relationship characteristics have a stronger influence on the odds of serial cohabitation than demographic predictors among Millennials, highlighting the context of young adulthood that includes uncertainty and high rates of cohabitation.

www.bgsu.edu…

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Vienna Institute of Demography Working Papers:

A. “Late Motherhood in Low-Fertility Countries: Reproductive Intentions, Trends and Consequence,” by Eva Beaujouan and Tomas Sobotka (VID Working Paper 2017/2, January 2017, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

Delayed parenthood is a central feature of the massive transformation of family and reproduction in rich countries. We analyse the shift of motherhood towards later reproductive ages during the last four decades and review its consequences for children and their mothers in low-fertility countries in Europe, North America, Oceania and East Asia. First we analyse the trends in birth rates at advanced reproductive ages (35+), including trends at very high reproductive ages (50+) and detailing the rapid rise in first and second birth rates at that ages. We show that a relatively high share of childless women and of women with one child aged 35-44 still plan to have a(nother) child in the future. Subsequently, we discuss the limited success rates of assisted reproduction at advanced reproductive ages and its contribution to parenthood at later ages. Next we outline the key drivers of delayed parenthood and its demographic consequences. Finally, we briefly review the consequences of delayed motherhood for pregnancy outcomes, maternal and child health and highlight selected positive consequences of later parenthood for mothers and children. We argue that economic and social rationales for late reproduction clash with the biological and health rationales for having children earlier in life.

www.oeaw.ac.at/fileadmin/subsites/Institute/VID/PDF/Publications/Working_Papers/WP2017_02_HFDRR.pdf…

B. “Post-Transitional Fertility: Childbearing Postponement and the Shift to Low and Unstable Fertility Levels,” by Tomas Sobotka (VID Working Paper 2017/1, January 2017, .pdf format, 35p.).

Abstract:

This study discusses fertility trends and variation in countries that have completed the transition from high to around-replacement fertility in the 1950s-1980s—especially in Europe, East Asia and North America—and summarises the key findings that are relevant for the countries with a more recent experience of fertility declines towards replacement level. A central finding is that there is no obvious theoretical or empirical threshold around which period fertility would tend to stabilise. Period fertility rates usually continue falling once the threshold of replacement fertility is crossed, often to very low levels. While cohort fertility rates frequently stabilise or change gradually, period fertility typically remains unstable. This instability also includes remarkable upturns and reversals in Total Fertility Rates (TFR), as experienced in many countries in Europe in the early 2000s. The long-lasting trend towards delayed parenthood is central for understanding the diverse, low and unstable post-transitional fertility patterns. In many countries in Europe this shift to a late childbearing pattern has negatively affected the TFR for more than four decades. Many of the emerging post-transitional countries and regions are likely to experience a similar shift during the next two to three decades, often depressing their TFRs to very low levels.

www.oeaw.ac.at/fileadmin/subsites/Institute/VID/PDF/Publications/Working_Papers/WP2017_01_HFDRR.pdf…

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–January 24, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10466-10507.

Health related: 10481, 10489, 10490.

Sociology related: 10502, 10506.

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National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Jan. 23, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23058-23089.

Health related: 23068, 23069.

Sociology related: 23063, 23069, 23079, 23087.

 

January 23, 2017

CSSRR Health/Sociology–January 23, 2017

Filed under: H. Working Papers,Health,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:22 pm

University of Pennsylvania Population Studies Center Working Paper: “The Role of Marriage in Fighting HIV: A Quantitative Illustration for Malawi,” by Jeremy Greenwood, Philipp Kircher, Cezar Santos, and Michele Tertilt (WP2017-7, January 2017, .pdf format, 7p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

repository.upenn.edu…

January 19, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Sociology–January 19, 2017

Filed under: E. Working Papers,Economics,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 5:23 pm

Max Planck Institute of Demographic Research Working Paper: “Working 9 to 5? Unionization and work variability, 2004-2013,” by Ryan Finnigan and Jo Mhairi Hale (WP-2017-02, January 2017, .pdf format,41p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/working_9_to_5_unionization_and_work_variability_2004_2013_5729.htm…

January 17, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–January 17, 2017

Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo) [Munich, Bavaria, Germany]: CESifo has recently released several new working papers:

www.cesifo-group.de/ifoHome/publications/working-papers/CESifoWP.html…

The new papers are numbered 6266-6278.

Health related: 6277.

Sociology related: 6269.

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National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Jan. 16, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23032-23057.

Health related: 23044, 23054.

Sociology related: 23038, 23043, 23050.

January 11, 2017

CSSRR Sociology–January 11, 2017

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 5:14 pm

Center for Research on Child Wellbeing [Princeton University] Working Paper: “Explaining the Consequences of Paternal Incarceration for Children’s Behavioral Problems,” by Allison Dwyer Emory (WP17-01-FF, January 2017, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Paternal incarceration has consistently been linked with aggression and acting-out in children, yet mechanisms underlying these behavioral problems remain unclear. Identifying these paths is essential for understanding how incarceration contributes to intergenerational disadvantage and determining how best to mitigate these collateral consequences for children. This article tests the extent to which changes incarceration imposes on children’s families after incarceration fill this important gap. Two key findings emerge from structural equation models using the longitudinal Fragile Families study. First, changes occurring within the child’s family account for nearly half of the total association between recent paternal incarceration and aggressive or externalizing behavior. Second, the father’s disengagement from the family and increased material hardship are the strongest and most consistent mechanisms. These findings suggest that targeting these two co-occurring hardships that families face when an incarceration occurs may be valuable for addressing child behavior.

crcw.princeton.edu…

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Paper: “Individual’s socioeconomic status, spousal and children’s education associated with self-rated health among Chinese elderly people,” by Lei Yang, Karri Silventoinen and Pekka Martikainen (WP-2017-01, January 2017, .pdf format, 22p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/individuals_socioeconomic_status_spousal_and_childrens_education_associated_with_self_rated_health_5730.htm…

January 9, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–January 9, 2017

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: IZA has recently released several new working papers.

www.iza.org…

The new working papers are: 10436-10465.

Health related: 10465.

Sociology related: 10445, 10456, 10458, 10462.

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National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Jan. 2, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 23015-23031.

Health related: 23017, 23031.

Sociology related: 23020, 23025, 23029.

January 4, 2017

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–January 4, 2016

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Jan. 2, 2017. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 22990-23014.

Health related: 23000, 23001, 23006.

Sociology related: 22993, 22996, 22998, 23002, 23003, 23013.

January 3, 2017

CSSRR Health/Sociology–January 3, 2017

Filed under: H. Working Papers,Health,S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 5:13 pm

University of Michigan Population Studies Center Working Paper: “Aging with Disability for Midlife and Older Adults,” by Lois M. Verbrugge, Kenzie Latham, and Philippa J. Clarke (PSC Research Report No. 17-874, January 2017, .pdf format, 33p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.psc.isr.umich.edu…

December 27, 2016

CSSRR Economics/Health/Sociology–December 27, 2016

National Bureau of Economic Research Working Papers: NBER has released the following working papers for the weeks of Dec. 26, 2016. Note: check your library for electronic availability.

www.nber.org…

New papers are: 22959-22989.

Health related: 22986, 22988.

Sociology related: 22963, 22967, 22981.

CSSRR Sociology–December 27, 2016

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:38 pm

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research Working Paper: “The Patriarchy Index: a new measure of gender and generational inequalities in the past,” by Mikolaj Szoltysek, Radoslaw Poniat, Siegfried Gruber and Sebastian Klusener (WP-2016-14, December 2016, .pdf format, 40p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.demogr.mpg.de/en/projects_publications/publications_1904/mpidr_working_papers/the_patriarchy_index_a_new_measure_of_gender_and_generational_inequalities_in_the_past_5722.htm…

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Vienna Institute of Demography Working Papers:

A. “Understanding the Syrian Educational System in a Context of Crisis,” by Mohammed Al Hessan in collaboration with Stephanie Bengtsson, and Judith Kohlenberger (VID Working Paper 9/2016, 2016, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

Up until the outbreak of conflict in 2011, Syrian young people were among the most educated in the Middle East region, with Syria having achieved near universal primary education enrolment and a high rate of completed secondary education. Due to the years of conflict, many Syrian are currently displaced within their country and across Syria’s borders. In 2015, large numbers made their way across Europe and applied for asylum in Germany, Austria, Sweden, etc. The Syrian crisis raises important education-related questions for the international community as a whole, like the educational background of Syrians currently on the move. This paper gives an overview of the Syrian educational system in order to build an understanding of Syrian education in the broader global context. It aims to provide detailed information that other researchers, policymakers, and practitioners can draw from to inform their own work. The current document was written within the framework of DiPAS (Displaced persons in Austria survey), a survey carried out in and around Vienna to study the socio-demographic characteristics, values and attitudes of asylum seekers arriving in Austria in 2015.

www.oeaw.ac.at/fileadmin/subsites/Institute/VID/PDF/Publications/Working_Papers/WP2016_09.pdf…

B. “Realisation of Fertility Intentions in Austria and Hungary: Are Capitals Different?” by Bernhard Riederer and Isabella Buber-Ennser (VID Working Paper 8/2016, 2016, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

The study of fertility intentions has gained importance in the literature during the last decades. Nevertheless, research focussing on their realisation is still scarce due to limited availability of longitudinal data. Although a bulk of existing studies demonstrated regional variation and rural-urban differences in fertility, respective differences in the realisation of fertility intentions have not been addressed in prior research. We address this shortcoming by analysing the realisation of short-term fertility intentions in Vienna and Budapest as opposed to the remaining parts of Austria and Hungary, using two waves of the Generations and Gender Survey (GGS). Results clearly demonstrate that those two capitals are different: Although short-term childbearing intentions are very similar in capitals and other parts of the countries, probabilities of realisation are lower in capitals. These differences in realisation are at least partly explained by individual characteristics of inhabitants. There are, however, also factors that affect realisation differently in metropolitan than in less populated regions.

www.oeaw.ac.at/fileadmin/subsites/Institute/VID/PDF/Publications/Working_Papers/WP2016_08.pdf…

December 23, 2016

CSSRR Sociology–December 23, 2016

Filed under: S. Working Papers,Sociology — admin @ 4:33 pm

National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research [CALDER] Working Paper: “Can UTeach? Assessing the Relative Effectiveness of STEM Teachers,” by Benjamin Backes, Dan Goldhaber, Whitney Cade, Kate Sullivan, and Melissa Dodson (Working Paper 173, December 2016, .pdf format, 51p.). Note: Links to the abstract and the full text of the paper available at:

www.ca…

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