Current Demographic Research Report #103, October 3, 2005.

CDERR (Current Demographic Research Reports) is a weekly email report produced by the Center for Demography and Ecology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison that helps researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/CDERR/subscribe.html

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Index to this issue:

CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

U.S.

_MMWR_ Dispatch
National Center for Health Statistics Reports
National Institutes of Health News Release
DHHS SAMHSA Report
DHHS AHCPR MEPS Statistical Briefs
National Center for Education Statistics Reports

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Australia:

Australian Department of Health and Ageing News Release Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Reports

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Austria:

Statistics Austria Compendium: _Austrian Statistical Yearbook 2005_

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Latvia:

Central Statistical Bureau of Latvia Press Release: "Children and adolescents from demographic point of view"

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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Articles:

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New Zealand:

Statistics New Zealand Report: "National Labour Force Projections (2001(base)--2051 update)

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Norway:

Statistics Norway Article: "Child welfare service investigations, 2004: 21,300 child welfare investigations"

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Pakistan:

Pakistan Federal Bureau of Statistics Compendia

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Palestine:

Palestine National Authority Central Bureau of Statistics Report: "Local Community Survey in the Palestinian Territory -2005"

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Singapore:

Statistics Singapore Compendium: "Population Trends 2005"

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South Africa:

Statistics South Africa Periodical

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South Korea:

Korea National Statistical Office Statistical Report: "International Migration in 2004"

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UK:

UK Department of Health Report: "Adults With Learning Difficulties in England 2003/4

OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

United Nations Population Fund Report: "International Migration and the Millennium Development Goals:

United Nations Children's Fund: "Progress for Children: A Report Card on Immunization"

United Nations Research Institute for Social Development Occasional Paper

World Bank Compendium, Periodical

Government Accountability Office Report: "Indian Health Service: Health Care Services Are Not Always Available to Native Americans

Amnesty International: "Stonewalled: Police abuse and misconduct against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the US"

Kaiser Family Foundation Report: "Medical Debt and Access to Health Care"

Population Reference Bureau Article: "Mexican Migrant Communities May Be
on Verge of HIV/AIDS Epidemic,"

Pew Hispanic Center: "Rise, Peak and Decline: Trends in U.S. Immigration 1992- 2004"

Urban Institute Reports

Ohio State University Research News Release

Cornell University Research News Release

Violence Policy Center Report: "When Men Murder Women"

Food Research and Action Center: "Food Stamp Access in Urban America..."

Journal of Religion and Society Article: "Societal Health with Popular
Religiosity and Secularism in the Prosperous Democracies"

_British Medical Journal Theme Issue_: Africa

Info Health Pop. Reporter

WORKING PAPERS

California Center for Population Research (UCLA)

Population Council Policy Research Division

National Bureau of Economic Research

Princeton University Center for Research on Child Wellbeing

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research

World Bank Policy Research Programme

Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA)

CESifo

TABLES OF CONTENTS

Ingenta

Other Journals

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS

World Congress on Public Health/Brazilian Congress on Collective Health

DATA

Census Bureau

Medical Expenditure Panel Survey

ICPSR

UK Data Archive

Luxembourg Income Study

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

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U.S.

1. _MMWR_ Dispatch: "Infectious Disease and Dermatologic Conditions in Evacuees and Rescue Workers After Hurricane Katrina --- Multiple States, August--September, 2005" (Vol. 54, Dispatch, HTML and .pdf format).

HTML:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm54d926a1.htm

.pdf:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/wk/mm54d926.pdf

2. National Center for Health Statistics Reports:

A. "National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: 2003 Summary," by Esther Hing, Donald K. Cherry, and David A. Woodwell (Advance Data No. 365, October 2005, .pdf format, 48p.).

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/ad/ad365.pdf

B. "Early Release of Selected Estimates Based on Data From the January-March 2005 National Health Interview Survey" (September 2005, .pdf format, 101p.). "In this release, the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) updates estimates for 15 selected health measures based on data from the January-March 2005 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) and presents estimates from 1997 through 2004 for comparison. New for this release, the indicator that previously presented estimates for receipt of influenza shots by adults has been expanded to include influenza vaccinations administered by nasal spray. In addition, estimates of both types of influenza vaccinations for children are provided for the first time in the Early Release. The 15 Early Release measures are being published prior to final data editing and final weighting to provide access to the most recent information from the NHIS. The estimates will be updated on a quarterly basis as each new quarter of the NHIS data becomes available."

http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/nhis/released200509.htm

3. National Institutes of Health News Release: "Scientists Show that Tick-Borne Flaviviruses Use a Novel Mechanism to Evade Host Defenses,"(September 28, 2005).

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/sep2005/niaid-28.htm

4. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality Medical Expenditure Panel Survey Statistical Briefs:

A. "Statin Use among Persons 18 and Older in the U.S. Civilian Non-institutionalized Population Reported as Receiving Medical Care for the Treatment of High Cholesterol, 2002," by Marie N. Stagnitti (Statistical Brief #95, September 2005, .pdf format, 6p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Household Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-HC) for 2002, this Statistical Brief provides estimates of persons with high cholesterol who were using a statin by selected demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, including age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=708

B. "Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance Costs, Offer Rates, and Take-Up Rates for Small Employers in the Private Sector, by Industry Classification, 2000 and 2003," by John Sommers and Richard Keach (Statistical Brief #98, September 2005, .pdf format, 5p.).

Abstract:

Using data from the Insurance Component of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS-IC) for 2000 and 2003, this Statistical Brief examines health insurance costs for small private sector employers and their enrolled employees as a percentage of payroll, by industry, for the years 2000 and 2003. The brief also shows the percentage of employees who worked at small private sector employers where health insurance was offered in those years and the percentage of these employees who enrolled during those years.

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=709

C. Trends in Children's Health Insurance Coverage for Families with Children, 1996-2002 (First Half)," by Julie Hudson (Statistical Brief #99 ,September 2005, .pdf format, 7p.).

Abstract:

This Statistical Brief presents estimates from the KIDSIM eligibility simulation model for the population of children in the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) in the first part of calendar years 1996 through 2002. All estimates are presented at the family level and include only those families with children age 18 and under

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/PrintProducts/PrintProd_Detail.asp?ID=712

5. National Center for Education Statistics Reports:

A. "Labor Force Participation in Formal Work-Related Education in 2000-01," by Lisa Hudson, Rajika Bhandari, Katharin Peter, and David B. Bills (NCES 2005048, September 2005, .pdf format, 157p.).

Abstract:

This report uses the Adult Education Survey of the 2001 National Household Education Survey Program to examine the extent and nature of participation in work-related education among adults in the labor force. The report provides data on instructional providers, topics studied, employer support, and other employment-related inducements for participation.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005048

B. "Postsecondary Institutions in the United States: Fall 2004 and Degrees and Other Awards Conferred: 2003-04," by Laura G. Knapp, Janice E. Kelly-Reid, Roy W. Whitmore, June Cong, Burton Levine, and Marcus Berzofsky (NCES 2005182, September 2005, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

This report presents information from the Fall 2004 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) web-based data collection. Data were requested from nearly 6,600 postsecondary institutions participating in Title IV federal student financial aid programs. The tables in this publication present counts of institutions by selected institutional characteristics including tuition, fees, and other costs. Tables also present data on the number of degrees and other formal awards conferred during the period July 1, 2003 through June 30, 2004 by Title IV postsecondary institutions.

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005182
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Australia:

1. Australian Department of Health and Ageing News Release: "NHMRC (National Health and Medical Research Council) funding for research into pandemic influenza" (ABB117/05, Sep. 28, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 2p.).

http://www.health.gov.au/internet/ministers/publishing.nsf/Content/health-mediarel-yr2005-ta-abb117.htm

2. Australian Institute of Health and Welfare Reports:

A. "Female SAAP [Supported Accomodation Assistance Program] Clients and Children Escaping Domestic and Family Violence 2003-04" (_AIHW Bulletin_, Issue 30, September 2005, .pdf format, 27p.).

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10136

B. "Alcohol and other drug treatment services in New South Wales," by C. Psychogios (September 29, 2005, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10163

C. "Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services in South Australia
(2003-04)," by C. Psychogios (September 29, 2005, .pdf format, 8p.).

http://www.aihw.gov.au/publications/index.cfm/title/10214
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Austria

Statistics Austria Compendium: _Austrian Statistical Yearbook 2005_ (2005, .pdf format, 598p.). "The Statistical Yearbook of Austria is a comprehensive reference book on official statistics and gives concise national information on the demographic, social and economical structure and development of Austria. The attached international part enables readers to make comparisons with European and non-European countries. All data have been clearly set out in the form of tables, many of which also include graphics presenting a quick and vivid overview of distributions and tendencies." Note: Table heads are given in both German and English.

http://www.statistik.gv.at/jahrbuch_2005/englisch/start.shtml

Click on any of the contents on the left side of the screen and then " Browse the Content" for link to full text.
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Latvia:

Central Statistical Bureau of Latvia Press Release: "Children and adolescents from demographic point of view" (Sep. 29, 2005).

http://www.csb.lv/ateksts.cfm?tem_kods=dem&datums=%7Bts%20%272005%2D09%2D29%2012%3A55%3A00%27%7D
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Netherlands:

Statistics Netherlands Web Magazine Articles:

A. "Strong rise in one-parent families" (Sep. 27, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/mens-maatschappij/bevolking/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1787-wm.htm

B. "Cardiovascular mortality reduced by half since 1970" (Sep. 27, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/mens-maatschappij/bevolking/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1785-wm.htm

C. "Big city crime rates down" (Sep. 27, 2005).

http://www.cbs.nl/en-GB/menu/themas/mens-maatschappij/rechtsbescherming-veiligheid/publicaties/artikelen/2005-1775-wm.htm
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New Zealand:

Statistics New Zealand Report: "National Labour Force Projections (2001(base)--2051 update) (September 2005, HTML and Microsoft Excel format

http://www2.stats.govt.nz/domino/external/pasfull/pasfull.nsf/web/Hot+Off+The+Press+National+Labour+Force+Projections+2001(base)+-+2051+update?open
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Norway:

Statistics Norway Article: "Child welfare service investigations, 2004: 21,300 child welfare investigations" (Sep. 29, 2005).

http://www.ssb.no/barnevernund_en/
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Pakistan:

Pakistan Federal Bureau of Statistics Compendia:

A. "Pakistan 2005 Statistical Pocket Book" (2005, .pdf format, 215p.).

http://www.statpak.gov.pk/depts/fbs/publications/pocket_book2005/pocket_book.html

B. "Pakistan Demographic Survey 2003" (2005, .pdf format).

http://www.statpak.gov.pk/depts/fbs/statistics/pds2003/pds2003.html
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Palestine:

Palestine National Authority Central Bureau of Statistics Report: "Local Community Survey in the Palestinian Territory -2005" (2005, .pdf format).

http://www.pcbs.org/press_r/Lcs_2005.aspx

Click on title or tables.
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Singapore:

Statistics Singapore Compendium: "Population Trends 2005" (2005, .pdf format, 44p.).

http://www.singstat.gov.sg/pdtsvc/pubn/population.html
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South Africa:

Statistics South Africa Periodical: _Bulletin of Statistics_ (Vol. 39, No. 3, September 2005, .pdf format, 152p.).

http://www.statssa.gov.za/Publications/Bulletin/BulletinSeptember2005.pdf
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South Korea:

Korea National Statistical Office Statistical Report: "International Migration in 2004"

http://www.nso.go.kr/eng/releases/report_view.html?num=462
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UK Department of Health Report: "Adults With Learning Difficulties in England 2003/4: Final and summary reports (September 2005, .pdf format, 129p.).

http://www.dh.gov.uk/PublicationsAndStatistics/PublishedSurvey/ListOfSurveySince1990/GeneralSurveys/GeneralSurveysArticle/fs/en?CONTENT_ID=4081207&chk=u%2Bd5fv

Links to full text are at the bottom of the page.

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

United Nations Population Fund Report: "International Migration and the Millennium Development Goals: Selected Papers of the UNFPA Expert Group Meeting" (2005, .pdf format, 261p.). "The growing interest in and visibility of international migration and the 5-year review of progress towards achievement of the Millennium Development Goals provided UNFPA with a good opportunity to convene recently an Expert Group Meeting (EGM) to analyze the interface between International Migration and the MDGs. The EGM discussed international migration as both a facilitating and constraining factor in the achievement of MDGs. The meeting also provided information for policy makers in planning and policy development on best practices in this complex area. Invited experts were requested to speak on a number of topics relating to migration and development, including poverty reduction, health, gender, environment and global partnerships for development. This report is a compilation of selected papers presented at
the meeting."

http://www.unfpa.org/publications/detail.cfm?ID=246

Click on "English" next to "PDF" for full text.
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United Nations Children's Fund Report: "Progress for Children: A Report Card on Immunization" (Report No. 3, September 2005, .pdf format, 32p.).

http://www.unicef.org/progressforchildren/2005n3/
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United Nations Research Institute for Social Development Occasional Paper: "Gendering Migration, Livelihood and Entitlements: Migrant Women in Canada and the United States," by Monica Boyd and Deanna Pikkov (UNRISD Occasional Paper No. 6, July 2005, .pdf format, 40p.). Links to a long abstract, as well as full text are available at:

http://www.unrisd.org/80256B3C005BCCF9/search/9A49929849CEB521C125708A004C328B?OpenDocument&cntxt=295B4&cookielang=en#top
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World Bank Compendium, Periodical:

A. "World development report 2006 : equity and development" (September 19, 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, 340p.).

Abstract:

World Development Report 2006 analyzes the relationship between equity and development. The report documents the persistence of inequality traps by highlighting the interaction between different forms of inequality. It presents evidence that the inequality of opportunity that arises is wasteful and inimical to sustainable development and poverty reduction. It also derives policy implications that center on the broad concept of leveling the playing field-both politically and economically and in the domestic and the global arenas. The report recognizes the intrinsic value of equity but aims primarily to document how a focus on equity matters for long-run development. It has three parts: Part I considers the evidence on inequality of opportunity, within and across countries. Part II asks why equity matters, discussing the two channels of impact (the effects of unequal opportunities when markets are imperfect, and the consequences of inequity for the quality of institutions a society develops) as well as intrinsic motives. Part III asks how public action can level the political and economic playing fields. In the domestic arena, it makes the case for investing in people, expanding access to justice, land, and infrastructure, and promoting fairness in markets. In the international arena, it considers leveling the playing field in the functioning of global markets and the rules that govern them-and the complementary provision of aid to help poor countries and poor people build greater endowments.

http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&theSitePK=469372&piPK=64165421&menuPK=64166093&entityID=000112742_20050920110826

B. "_Bulletin of the World Health Organization_ (Vol. 83, No. 10, October 2005, .pdf format).

http://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/83/10/en/index.html
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Government Accountability Office Report: "Indian Health Service: Health Care Services Are Not Always Available to Native Americans" (GAO-05-1042, September 2005, .pdf format, 30p.).

http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d05789.pdf

Note: This is a temporary addresses. GAO reports are always available at:

http://www.gpoaccess.gov/gaoreports/index.html
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Amnesty International Report: "Stonewalled: Police abuse and misconduct against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the US," (2005, .pdf format, 149p.).

http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/document.do?id=ENGUS20050922002

Click on "Download the full report" at the end of the page.

More information on AI:

http://www.amnestyusa.org/index.html
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Kaiser Family Foundation Report: "Medical Debt and Access to Health Care," by Catherine Hoffman, Diane Rowland, and Elizabeth C. Hamel (Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, September 2005, .pdf format, 25p.). "This study examines the privately insured who have had problems paying medical bills and compares their access to care to those who have not had medical bill problems as well as those with no health coverage at all, using a national representative survey of adults. The study finds that care-seeking patterns among those with private coverage but having problems paying their medical bills resembled those of the uninsured.

http://www.kff.org/uninsured/7403.cfm

Click on "Report" for full text
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Population Reference Bureau Article: "Mexican Migrant Communities May Be on Verge of HIV/AIDS Epidemic," by Eliza Barclay (September 2005).

http://www.prb.org/Template.cfm?Section=PRB&template=/Content/ContentGroups/05_Articles/Mexican_Migrant_Communities_May_Be_on_Verge_of_HIV_AIDS_Epidemic.htm
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Pew Hispanic Center Report: "Rise, Peak and Decline: Trends in U.S. Immigration 1992- 2004," by Jeffrey S. Passel and Roberto Suro (September 2005, .pdf format, 56p.).

http://pewhispanic.org/reports/report.php?ReportID=53
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Urban Institute Reports:

A. "Who's Left Behind? Immigrant Children in High and Low LEP Schools," by Clemencia Cosentino de Cohen, Nicole Deterding, and Beatriz Chu Clewell (September 30, 2005, .pdf format, 37p.).

B. "The New Demography of America's Schools: Immigration and the No Child Left Behind Act," by Randolph Capps, Michael E. Fix, Julie Murray, Jason Ost, Jeffrey S. Passel, and Shinta Herwantoro (September 30, 2005, .pdf format, 41p.).

Both reports are linked from an Urban Institute news release: "High Concentration of Limited-English Students Challenges Implementation of No Child Left Behind Act" (Sep. 30, 2005).

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=900884

Both links are in the 2nd from last paragraph of the news release.

C. "Who Gets the Child Tax Credit?," by Leonard E. Burman and Laura Wheaton (October 3, 2005, .pdf format, 10p.).

Abstract:

In 1997, Congress created a $500 per child tax credit (CTC). It has since been increased to $1,000 and made available to some lower-income families with children, even if they had no tax liability. Still, many low-income families (as well as some with high incomes) receive less than $1,000 per child in tax benefits. Moreover, because of differences in income, family composition, and employment status, nearly half of Blacks and 46 percent of Hispanics receive no or reduced benefits from the CTC because their incomes are too low. By comparison, only 18 percent of White children are in that category.

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=411232
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Ohio State University Research News Release: "Death Sentences Linked to History of Lynching in States" (Sep. 26, 2005).

http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/dthplty.htm
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Cornell University Research News Release: "Unwed mothers' prospects for marrying well, or at all, are greatly diminished, Cornell study finds," by Susan S. Lang (Sep. 26, 2005).

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Sept05/moms.marriage.ssl.html
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Violence Policy Center Report: "When Men Murder Women": "When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2003 Homicide Data," (September 2005, .pdf format, 33p.). The report is linked to from a VPC Press Release: "Violence Policy Center Issues Annual Report When Men Murder Women: Study, Released for Domestic Violence Awareness Month in October, Ranks Alaska #1 in Rate of Women Murdered by Men" (Sep. 26, 2005).

http://www.vpc.org/press/0509wmmw.htm

Click on title for link to full text.

More information about the Violence Policy Center:

http://www.vpc.org/aboutvpc.htm
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Food Research and Action Center Report: "Food Stamp Access in Urban America: A City-by-City Snapshot," (September 2005, .pdf format, 31p.). The report is linked to from A FRAC news release: "US Cities Get Foodstamp Benefits to More Needy People, but Still Leave Many Eligible Families Unserved" (Sep. 28, 2005).

http://www.frac.org/Press_Release/09.27.05.html

More information about FRAC:

http://www.frac.org/html/all_about_frac/about_index.html
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Journal of Religion and Society Article: Note: The _Journal of Religion& Society_ is a refereed [electronic] academic journal produced by the Kripke Center for the Study of Religion and Society at Creighton University [Omaha, Nebraska], which is dedicated to the publication of scholarly research in religion and its diverse social dimensions. All submissions to the journal will be subject to blind peer review." "Cross-National Correlations of Quantifiable Societal Health with Popular Religiosity and Secularism in the Prosperous Democracies: a First Look,"by Gregory S. Paul (Volume 7, 2005, HTML and .pdf format, 17p.).

Abstract:

Large-scale surveys show dramatic declines in religiosity in favor of secularization in the developed democracies. Popular acceptance of evolutionary science correlates negatively with levels of religiosity, and the United States is the only prosperous nation where the majority absolutely believes in a creator and evolutionary science is unpopular. Abundant data is available on rates of societal dysfunction and health in the first world. Cross-national comparisons of highly differing rates of religiosity and societal conditions form a mass epidemiological experiment that can be used to test whether high rates of belief in and worship of a creator are necessary for high levels of social health. Data correlations show that in almost all regards the highly secular democracies consistently enjoy low rates of societal dysfunction, while pro-religious and anti-evolution America performs poorly.

HTML:

http://moses.creighton.edu/JRS/2005/2005-11.html

.pdf:

http://moses.creighton.edu/JRS/pdf/2005-11.pdf

_JRS_ Archives:

http://moses.creighton.edu/JRS/toc/Archive.html
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_British Medical Journal Theme Issue_: Africa: The latest issue of _BMJ_ (Vol. 331, No. 7519, Oct. 1, 2005, is a special theme issue on Africa. Extracts of news stories, editorials, etc., and abstracts of papers are freely available to the public. Full text is available to licensed institutions. Check your institution's Library.

http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/content/vol331/issue7519/
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Info Health Pop. Reporter: Info Health Pop. Reporter: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Communication Programs Compendium: Info Health Pop. Reporter (vol. 5, no. 40, Oct. 3, 2005). " The Johns Hopkins University Population Information Program delivers the reproductive health and family planning news you need. Each week our research staff prepares an electronic magazine loaded with links to key news stories, reports, and related developments around the globe."

http://www.infoforhealth.org/popreporter/

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WORKING PAPERS:

California Center for Population Research (UCLA): CCPR has recently released the following working papers. Links to extensive abstracts and full text (.pdf format) can be found at:

http://www.ccpr.ucla.edu/asp/papers.asp#2005

Asians and Pacific Islanders in Same-Sex Couples in California, by Gary Gates and R. Bradley Sears (CCPR-021-05)

Fertility Regulation and Economic Shocks, by Elizabeth Frankenberg, Christopher McKelvey and Duncan Thomas (CCPR 022-05)

Air Quality and Early-Life Mortality During Indonesia's Massive Wildfires in 1997, by Seema Jayachandran (CCPR-023-05)

Biology as Destiny? Short and Long-Run Determinants of Intergenerational Transmission of Birth Weight, by Janet Currie and Enrico Moretti (CCPR-024-05)

Fiscal Shenanigans, Targeted Federal Health Care Funds, and Patient Mortality, by Katherine Baicker and Douglas Staiger (CCPR-025-05)

Medicare Spending, The Physician Workforce, and Beneficiaries' Quality of Care, by Katherine Baicker and Amitabh Chandra (CCPR-026-05)

The Effect of Mandated State Education Spending on Total Local Resources, by Katherine Baicker and Nora Gordon (CCPR-027-05)

The Effect of Malpractice Liability on the Delivery of Health Care, by Katherine Baicker and Amitabh Chandra (CCPR-028-05)
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Population Council Policy Research Division: "How Many Years of Life Could Be Saved If Malaria Were Eliminated from a Hyperendemic Area of Northern Ghana?," by Ayaga A. Bawah and Fred N. Binka (No. 203, 2005, .pdf format, 27p.).

Abstract:

Malaria is endemic in about 90 countries of the world, half of which are in Africa. Little is known about the demographic impact of the disease, however. This paper uses demographic methods to examine the impact of mortality from malaria on overall mortality in a hyperendemic rural African setting. We use longitudinal demographic surveillance data from northern Ghana to estimate the total number of person-years that would have been saved had malaria been eliminated from the population in 1995, given the age- and cause-specific mortality conditions of the period and gains in life expectancy that are implied. Results suggest that as many as one-third of deaths in this population are attributable to malaria, depending on the age group under consideration, and that life expectancy at birth would likely increase by more than six years if malaria were eliminated as a cause of death.

http://www.popcouncil.org/pdfs/wp/203.pdf
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National Bureau of Economic Research: "Do School-To-Work Programs Help the 'Forgotten Half'? by David Neumark and Donna Rothstein (w11636, September 2005, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

This paper tests whether school-to-work (STW) programs are particularly beneficial for those less likely to go to college in their absence--often termed the "forgotten half" in the STW literature. The empirical analysis is based on the NLSY97, which allows us to study six types of STW programs, including job shadowing, mentoring, coop, school enterprises, tech prep, and internships/apprenticeships. For men there is quite a bit of evidence that STW program participation is particularly advantageous for those in the forgotten half. For these men, specifically, mentoring and coop programs increase post-secondary education, and coop, school enterprise, and internship/apprenticeship programs boost employment and decrease idleness after leaving high school. There is less evidence that STW programs are particularly beneficial for women in the forgotten half, although internship/apprenticeship programs do lead to positive earnings effects concentrated among these women.

http://papers.nber.org/papers/W11636
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Princeton University Center for Research on Child Wellbeing [Princeton, New Jersey]:

A. "A National Study of Neighborhood Safety, Outdoor Play, Television Viewing, and Obesity in Preschool Children," by Hillary L. Burdette and Robert C. Whitaker (Working Paper # 2005-25. It can also be found in _Pediatrics_, Vol. 116, No. 3, September 2005, p. 657-662),

Abstract:

Objective. To test the hypothesis that preschool children have a higher prevalence of obesity, spend less time playing outdoors, and spend more time watching television (TV) when they live in neighborhoods that their mothers perceive as unsafe. Methods. In a cross-sectional survey in 20 large US cities, mothers reported the average daily time of outdoor play and TV viewing for their 3-year-old children, and the children's BMI was measured. Maternal perception of neighborhood safety was assessed with the Neighborhood Environment for Children Rating Scales; the scale score was used to divide children into tertiles of neighborhood safety.

Results. Of the 3141 children studied, 35% lived in households with incomes below the US poverty threshold. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors (household income and mothers' education, race/ethnicity, age, and marital status), obesity prevalence (BMI 95th percentile) did not differ in children from the least safe to the safest neighborhood safety tertile (18% vs 17% vs 20%) or in weekday (160 vs 151 vs 156 minutes/day) or weekend (233 vs 222 vs 222 minutes/day) outdoor play time. Children who lived in neighborhoods that were perceived by their mothers as the least safe watched more TV (201 vs 182 vs 185 minutes/day) and were more likely to watch >2 hours/day (66% vs 60% vs 62%). TV viewing and outdoor play minutes were not significantly correlated to each other or to BMI.

Conclusions. In a national sample of preschool children, mothers' perception of neighborhood safety was related to their children's TV viewing time but not to their outdoor play time or risk for obesity.

The abstract is available at:

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/116/3/657

Full electronic text of this journal from the journal site may be available at your institution. Check your institution's library. Full electronic text of this journal is also available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

B. Strengthening Unmarried Families: Could Enhancing Couple Relationships Also Improve Parenting?" by Marcy Carlson and Sara McLanahan (Working Paper # 2005-26-FF, September 2005, .pdf format, 28p.).

Abstract:

Policymakers are proposing to promote "healthy marriage" among low-income unmarried couples by providing services to improve relationship skills. We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study to explore whether enhancing parents' relationship skills may have spillover effects on parent-child relationships. Drawing on literature showing that relationship quality is positively associated with parenting among married couples, we examine whether a similar link holds for unmarried couples. We find a positive association between parents' relationship quality at the time of a baby's birth and parenting about one year later for both mothers and fathers. We observe essentially no differences by marital status and no differences among unmarried couples by co-residence or first birth status.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP05-26-FF.pdf
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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research:

A. "Social differentials in speed-premium effects in childbearing in Sweden," by Gunnar Andersson, Jan M. Hoem, and Ann-Zofie Duvander (MPIDR Working Paper WP-2005-027, September 2005, .pdf format, 20p.).

Abstract:

In Sweden, parents receive a parental-leave allowance of a high percentage of their pre-birth salary for about a year in connection with any birth. (The percentage has changed over time, as has the period for which it is paid. For a birth that appears in 2005, parents get 80% of the salary for thirteen months.) If they space their births sufficiently closely, they avoid a reduction in the allowance caused by any reduced income earned between the births. The gain is popularly called a "speed premium". After some precursors in legal practice, this rule was made statutory in 1980 and the "eligibility interval" was then set to 24 months. In 1986, it was extended to more attainable thirty months. In previous work we have displayed a corresponding speed-up effect in childbearing for Swedish-born women. This change in behavior is of general interest since it is clear evidence of a causal effect of a policy change on childbearing behavior. In the present paper, we study how this change in behavior was adopted in different social strata of the Swedish population. We examine whether the speed-up of childbearing differed by educational attainment and by country of origin, to see whether some social groups reacted faster or more strongly to the policy change than others. We cannot find any important difference in the reaction to the introduction of the "speed premium" between educational groups of Swedish-born parents. Similarly, we find no important difference in the mode of reaction between Swedish-born women and Nordic immigrants to the country. By contrast, immigrants from non-Nordic countries hardly seem to have reacted to the "speed premium".

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2005-027.pdf

B. "Fertility transition and the progression to third birth in Turkey," by Sutay Yavuz (MPIDR Working Paper WP 2005-028, September 2005, .pdf format, 26p.).

Abstract:

During the last two decades, Turkey entered into the last phase of its demographic transition. The latest nationwide Turkey Demographic and Health Survey (TDHS) reveals that the current TFR is close to reproduction level, with a wide range of west-east regional disparity. The purpose of this study is to examine important determinants of third-birth intensities of two-child mothers by applying event-history analysis to retrospective survey data. Some of the basic socioeconomic characteristics of women and their first marriages--related to the cultural context of fertility behavior--are investigated with hazard regression models. We demonstrate that the third-birth intensities differ considerably by mother tongue of the woman. Turkish-speaking women who read easily and who were employed and covered by social security before their first marriage had the lowest transition rate from second to third child. In contrast, Kurdish women who could not read and who did not work had the highest third-birth risk. While the fertility decline among Turkish women has been constant for two decades, the fertility remains high among illiterate Kurdish women, who can be classified as laggards in the Turkey's fertility transition.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2005-028.pdf

C. "Teenage Childbearing and Child Health in Eritrea," by Gebremariam Woldemicael (MPIDR Working Paper WP 2005-029, September 2005, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

Context: Eritrea experienced a decline in fertility between the mid-1990s and the first years of the new century. Much of the decline was observed among older women of reproductive age (20-49). Teenage childbearing is still high, although a decline is evident at these ages as well. The high rate of teenage childbearing is related to adverse health risks for the mother and child.

Methods: Data from the 2002 Eritrea Demographic and Health Survey (EDHS) are used to examine teenage childbearing and its health consequences. Bivariate analysis is used to calculate trends and differentials in teenage childbearing. Logistic and Cox hazard models are employed to examine the health impact of teenage childbearing on mothers and their children.

Results: Teenage childbearing is high in Eritrea, where around half of all women aged 19 have already been pregnant with their first child. Marriage is the most important factor causing women to initiate early childbearing and nearly all first births (97%) among teenagers occur within marriage. Social inequalities in early childbearing are evident: in both the 1995 and 2002 surveys, a lower probability of childbearing can be seen for teenagers with some education and living in urban areas compared to those who are uneducated or in rural areas. A decline in teenage childbearing is evident in all social groups over the period 1995-2002, except for urban residents. If the mother is a teenager when she gives birth, particularly if she is under 18, she can expect worse prenatal medical care, an increased risk of low birth weight and higher child mortality compared to an older mother. The effect of age of mother is significant even when controlling for other socio-demographic factors.

Conclusion: The significant effect of age of mother demonstrates that the health impact of teenage childbearing is not only due to socio-demographic factors that affect the teenager at different levels--at the community, household and individual levels--but also due to biological factors. Thus, strategies designed to reduce the health effects of teenage childbearing should address both maternal age and behavioral factors.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2005-029.pdf

D. "Cohabitation in Italy: Do parents matter?" by Christin Schroder (WP-2005-030, September 2005, .pdf format, 57p.).

Abstract:

Over the last two decades, Europe has witnessed the spreading of a new phenomenon: cohabitation. Whereas this modern living arrangement has become relatively widespread in most European countries, it has been rather hesitant in developing in Italy. The welfare state structure of this country, a high rate of unemployment, and tight housing is hampering the diffusion of cohabitation. Researchers so far have assumed that traditionally strong family ties between parents and their adult children have been responsible for the slow spread of extramarital unions. Our research, however, produces different results: There is evidence that the educational degree of the mother influences to a large extent the transition to cohabitation of women in Italy. Using the Indagine longitudinale sulle famiglie italiane (ILFI) of 1997 and 1999, we estimate multiplicative intensity models for the transition to (i) cohabitation as first relationship and (ii) direct marriage of women in Italy. Referring to our findings and to recent research on cohabitation in general, we develop two sets of interview guidelines for semi-structured interviews with cohabiting and married women (who experienced a previous cohabitation) in Italy. The interviews will be conducted in Italian, so the guidelines are in Italian as well. Our first pilot interview indicates that the second demographic transition is more advanced in northern Italy than the current literature would lead one to expect.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2005-030.pdf
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World Bank Policy Research Programme: "Inequality is bad for the poor," by Martin Ravallion (WPS 3677, August 2005, ASCII text and .pdf format, 50p.).

Abstract:

It has been argued that inequality should be of little concern in poor countries on the grounds that (1) absolute poverty in terms of consumption (or income) is the overriding issue in poor countries, and (2) the only thing that really matters to reducing absolute income poverty is the rate of economic growth. The author takes (1) as given but questions (2). He argues that there are a number of ways in which the extent of inequality in a society, and how it evolves over time, influences the extent of poverty today and the prospects for rapid poverty reduction in the future.

http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&theSitePK=469382&piPK=64165421&menuPK=64166093&entityID=000016406_20050804140846

Links to full text are at the bottom of the abstract.
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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA):

A. "Labor Supply and Child Care Costs: The Effect of Rationing," by Daniela Del Boca and Daniela Vuri (Discussion Paper 1779, September 2005, .pdf format, 40p.).

Abstract:

In Italy the participation of women has not increased very much in the last few decades relative to other developed countries and it is still among the lowest in Europe. The female employment rate stands almost 13 percentage points below the EU average and 22 below the Lisbon target. One of the most important reasons is related to the characteristics of child care system. In this paper we analyze the characteristics of the child care system in Italy and its relationship to the labor market participation decision of mothers. We present a simple discrete choice framework in which the two decisions can be jointly considered, which also allows for simple forms of rationing and estimate a bivariate probit model of the child care and employment decisions and interpret the results within the framework of our model. We find evidence that rationing is an important factor in interpreting price effects on utilization rates.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1779.pdf

B. "Improving the Modeling of Couples' Labour Supply," by Robert Breunig, Deborah Cobb-Clark, and Xiaodong Gong (Discussion Paper 1773, September 2005, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

We study the work hours of Australian couples, using a neoclassical labour-supply model in which couples choose from a small, realistic set of possible wife-husband working hour combinations We introduce three improvements to this standard model. First, we allow partners' preferences about non-market time to be correlated. We also correct the estimates to account for the fact that we estimate the non-observable wage rates of individuals who do not work. Lastly, we allow each individual's preferences for non-market time to be correlated with her or his wage rate. These changes, which substantially enhance the realism of the standard, discretized labour-supply model, also have an important impact on the results. We estimate the model using HILDA data and find wage elasticities of labour supply--0.26 for men and 0.50 for women--that are twice as large as those found without these three innovations. Using simulation methods, we then analyze the expected impact of the 2005/06 Australian tax reform. As a result of the tax cuts, we expect working hours to increase by 1.7 per cent for both men and women and household after-tax incomes to increase by approximately $60 per week on average. For families with two wage earners, each earning between $25,000 and $55,000 per year, our model predicts an after-tax increase in income of $38 after accounting for these labour supply effects--much larger than the Australian Government's own prediction of $12, which does not allow for labour supply effects.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1773.pdf

C. "The Influence of Market Wages and Parental History on Child Labour and Schooling in Egypt," by Jackline Wahba (Discussion Paper 1771, September 2005, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

This paper examines the influence of adult market wages and having parents who were child labourers on child labour, when this decision is jointly determined with child schooling, using data from Egypt. The empirical results suggest that low adult market wages are key determinants of child labour; a 10 percent increase in the illiterate male market wage decreases the probability of child labour by 22 percent for boys and 13 percent for girls. The findings also indicate the importance of social norms in the inter-generational persistence of child labour: parents who were child labourers themselves are on average 10 percent more likely to send their children to work. In addition, higher local regional income inequality increases the likelihood of child labour.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1771.pdf

D. "The Incidence and Cost of Job Loss in the Ukrainian Labor Market," by Hartmut Lehmann, Norberto Pignatti, and Jonathan Wadsworth (Discussion Paper 1770, September 2005, .pdf format, 43p.).

Abstract:

We examine the effects of economic transition on the pattern and costs of worker displacement in Ukraine, using the Ukrainian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (ULMS) for the years 1992 to 2002. Displacement rates in the Ukrainian labor market average between 3.4 and 4.8 percent of employment, roughly in line with levels typically observed in several Western economies, but considerably larger than in Russia. The characteristics of displaced workers are similar to those displaced in the West, in so far as displacement is concentrated on the less skilled. Around one third of displaced workers find re-employment immediately while the majority continues into long-term non-employment. The wage costs of displacement for the sub-sample of displaced workers do not seem to be large. The main cost for displaced workers in Ukraine consists in the extremely long non-employment spell that the average worker experiences after layoff.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1770.pdf

E. "Vocational Training and Gender: Wages and Occupational Mobility among Young Workers," by Bernd Fitzenberger and Astrid Kunze (Discussion Paper No. 1766, September 2005, .pdf format, 41p.).

Abstract:

This paper investigates the relationship between the gender wage gap, the choice of training occupation, and occupational mobility. We use longitudinal data for young workers with apprenticeship training in West Germany. Workers make occupational career choices early during their careers and women and men pursue very different occupational careers. We reconsider whether through occupational segregation women are locked in low wage careers (Kunze, 2005) or whether they can move up to higher wage paths through mobility. We furthermore investigate whether patterns have changed across cohorts during the period 1975 and 2001 and whether effects vary across the distribution. The main results are: First, while there exists a persistent gender wage gap over experience, the gap has decreased over time. Second, in the lower part of the wage distribution, the gap is highest and it increases with experience. Third, occupational mobility is lower for women than for men and the wage gains due to occupational mobility are higher for men than for women, especially in the lower part of the wage distribution. We conclude that occupational mobility has reduced the gender wage gap, but lock-in effects are still stronger for women compared to men.

ftp://ftp.iza.org/dps/dp1766.pdf
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Center for Economic Studies/Ifo Institute for Economic Research (CESifo) [University of Munich, Germany:

A. "Migration and the Welfare State: The Economic Power of the Non-Voter?" by Kira Boerner and Silke Uebelmesser (WP 1517, August 2005, .pdf format, 25p.).

Abstract:

This paper investigates the impact of emigration on the political choice regarding the size of the welfare state. Mobility has two countervailing effects: the political participation effect and the tax base effect. With emigration, the composition of the constituency changes. This increases the political influence of the less mobile part of the population. The new political majority has to take into account that emigration reduces tax revenues and thereby affects the feasible set of redistribution policies. The interaction of the two effects has so far not been analyzed in isolation. We find that the direction of the total effect of migration depends on the initial income distribution in the economy. Our results also contribute to the empirical debate on the validity of the median-voter approach for explaining the relation between income inequality and redistribution levels.

http://www.cesifo.de/portal/page?_pageid=36,302752&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_file_id=11419

Click on "Download PDF", at the bottom of the abstract, for link to full text.

B. "Education Policy and Equality of Opportunity," by Gabriela Schuetz, Heinrich Ursprung, and Ludger Woessmann (WP 1518, August 2005, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

We provide a measure of equality of educational opportunity in 54 countries, estimated as the effect of family background on student performance in two international TIMSS tests. We then show how organizational features of the education system affect equality of educational opportunity. Our model predicts that late tracking and a long pre-school cycle are beneficial for equality, while pre-school enrollment is detrimental at low levels of enrollment and beneficial at higher levels. Using cross-country variations in education policies and their interaction with family background at the student level, we provide empirical evidence supportive of these predictions.

http://www.cesifo.de/portal/page?_pageid=36,302752&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL&p_file_id=11420

Click on "Download PDF", at the bottom of the abstract, for link to full text.

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=========================================================================

JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

INGENTA Tables of Contents: INGENTA provides fee based document delivery services for selected journals.

A. Point your browser to:

http://www.ingenta.com/

B. click on "advanced search"
C. Type in your publication name and click "Exact title" radio button
D. Under "Show", click the "fax/ariel" radio button.
E. View the table of contents for the issue noted.

Journal of Biosocial Science (Vol. 37, No. 5, 2005).

Journal of Political Economy (Vol. 113, No. 4, 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.
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Other Journals:

American Journal of Epidemiology (Vol. 162, No. 8, Oct. 15, 2005).

http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/vol162/issue8/index.dtl?etoc

Public Opinion Quarterly (Vol. 69 no. 3, Fall 2005). Note: Full electronic text of this journal is available in the ProQuest Research Library. Check your library for the availability of this database and this issue.

http://poq.oxfordjournals.org/

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=========================================================================

CONFERENCES/CALLS FOR PAPERS:

World Congress on Public Health/Brazilian Congress on Collective Health: " 11th World Congress on Public Health/8th Brazilian Congress on Collective Health," a conference to be held in Rio de Janiero, Brazil, Aug. 21-26, 2006. For more information, including registration and calls for papers information, see:

http://www.wfphacongress06.com/ingles/papers.htm

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=========================================================================

DATA:

Census Bureau:

A. Data from State and Local Government Employee-Retirement Systems survey is now available for 2004 (September 2005). Data tables can be viewed in HTML, ASCII text, and Excel format. Data can be downloaded in Excel and ASCII format. The files contain "[a]nnual data on revenues, expenditures, financial assets and membership for public employee-retirement systems. Data are shown for individual retirement systems as well as aggregately at the national, state and local levels."

http://www.census.gov/govs/www/retire.html

B. "Nonemployer Statistics: 2003" (September 2005, HTML, .pdf, and comma delimited ASCII format). The data is linked to from a Census Bureau news release: "Nation Adds 1 Million Self-Employed Businesses to Reach 18.6 Million, Census Bureau Reports" (CB05-140, Sep. 30, 2005).

http://www.census.gov/Press-Release/www/releases/archives/business_ownership/005784.html

Click on "Nonemployer Statistics: 2003" for link to data.

C. "School Enrollment Social and Economic Characteristics of Students: October 2004," (October 2005, comma separated value [.csv], and Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.census.gov/population/www/socdemo/school.html

Click on "Detailed Tables" under "CPS October 2004".
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Medical Expenditure Panel Survey:

A. "MEPS HC-077D: 2003 Hospital Inpatient Stays File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, August 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=186

B. "MEPS HC-077G: 2003 Office-Based Medical Provider Visits File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, August 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=189

C. "MEPS HC-077F: 2003 Outpatient Department Visits," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, August 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=188

D. "MEPS HC-077E: 2003 Emergency Room Visits File," (US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, August 2005, data in .zip and .exe self-decompressing ASCII and SAS transport format, SAS and SPSS programming statements, documentation in HTML, .pdf or ASP codebook format).

http://www.meps.ahcpr.gov/Puf/PufDetail.asp?ID=187
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Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research: ICPSR at the University of Michigan has recently released the following datasets, which may be of interest to demography researchers. Note: Some ICPSR studies are available only to ICPSR member institutions. To find out whether your organization is a member, and whether or not it supports ICPSR Direct downloading, see:

http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/membership/index.html

Japanese General Social Survey (JGSS), 2003 (#4242)

http://webapp.icpsr.umich.edu/cocoon/ICPSR-STUDY/04242.xml
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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following dataset to its holdings. Note: There may be charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

Survey of English Housing, 2002-2003 (SN 5236)

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5236
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Luxembourg Income Study: The LIS project has added data for Greece to the LIS database. Data from 1995 and 2000 are now available.

http://www.lisproject.org/techdoc/gr/grindex.htm

Database Access:

http://www.lisproject.org/dataccess.htm

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Jack Solock
Data Librarian--Center for Demography and Ecology
4470 Social Science
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Madison, WI 53706
608-262-9827
jsolock@ssc.wisc.edu