Current Social Science Research Report--Sociology #55, March 18, 2008.

CSSRR-Social is a weekly email report produced by the Data and Information Services Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. It seeks to help social science researchers keep up to date with the latest developments in the field. This report will contain selected listings of new: reports, articles, bibliographies, working papers, tables of contents, conferences, data, and websites. For more information, including an archive of back issues and subscription information see:

http://www.disc.wisc.edu/reports/cssrindex.html

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CSSRR-Social is compiled and edited by Jack Solock and Charlie Fiss.

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To CSSRR-Econ #55

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CSSRR-Index

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Index to this issue:

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT AND NGO STATISTICAL PUBLICATIONS

US

US STATES

NGO AND OTHER COUNTRIES

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.

WORKING PAPERS

TABLES OF CONTENTS

CONFERENCES

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES

DATA

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CENTRAL GOVERNMENT STATISTICAL AND NGO PUBLICATIONS

US:

1. Department of State Report: "2007 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices," (March 2008).

http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2007/

2. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services News Release: "SCHIP Covering More Kids In 2007, New CMS Data Show" (Mar. 12, 2008).

http://www.cms.hhs.gov/apps/media/press/release.asp?Counter=2970

3. National Center for Education Statistics Report, Compendium:

A. "Employees in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2006, and Salaries of Full-Time Instructional Faculty, 2006-07," by Laura G. Knapp, Janice E. Kelly-Reid, Scott A. Ginder, and Elise Miller (NCES 2008172, March 2008, .pdf format, 40p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2008172

B. "Trends in Undergraduate Borrowing II: Federal Student Loans in 1995-96, 1999-2000, and 2003-04," by Christina Chang Wei and Lutz Berkner (NCES 2008179, February 2008, .pdf format, 117p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2008179

C. Mini-Digest of Education Statistics 2007," by Thomas D. Snyder (NCES 2008023, March 2008, .pdf format, 75p.).

http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2008023

4. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General Report: "Division of Unaccompanied Children's Services: Efforts To Serve Children," (OEI-07-06-00290, March 2008, .pdf format, 29p.).

Report Summary:

OIG found that most children were placed and released in accordance with the Flores Agreement, with 84 percent of children admitted to a facility within 3 days of apprehension. However, all children's case files lacked at least one required document that would indicate whether a child received medical or mental health services or participated in educational or recreational activities. Additionally, the Division of Unaccompanied Children's Services provided limited oversight of facilities.

Finally, no explicit agreement exists between the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Homeland Security (DHS) regarding information exchange and postrelease activities. OIG recommended that ACF (1) enforce documentation requirements to ensure that needs are assessed and care provided; (2) enhance and define field staff role in ongoing oversight; and (3) establish a memorandum of understanding between HHS and DHS.

In its written comments to the draft report, ACF did not indicate whether it concurred with our recommendations. ACF did indicate that it agrees that the monitoring of facility documentation and practices is needed; that ORR will include random interviews with children and case file reviews as part of the routine responsibilities for Federal field specialists; and that ORR is drafting a Joint Operations Manual with DHS, with the ultimate goal of drafting a Memorandum of Understanding. We ask that, in its final management decision, ACF more clearly indicate whether it concurs with our recommendations and what steps, if any, it will take to implement them.

http://www.oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-07-06-00290.pdf

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US States:

North Dakota:

State Data Center Updates:

A. "Total Population Estimates by 5 Year Age Cohorts in North Dakota by County: July 1, 2006 Estimates" (March 2008, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format).

.pdf:

http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/sdc/data/estimates/NDcnty_Age2006.pdf

Excel:

http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/sdc/data/estimates/NDcnty_Age2006.xls

B. "Community Alcohol Readiness Study: 2006 Student Survey Results," by Kendra Erickson, Ramona Danielson, and Richard Rathge (February 2008, .pdf format, 80p.).

http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/sdc/publications/communityreadiness/2006follow-up/CAR_Student_FINAL.pdf

C. "Community Alcohol Readiness Study: 2006 Adult Survey Results," by Kendra Erickson, Ramona Danielson, and Richard Rathge (February 2008, .pdf format, 106p.).

http://www.ndsu.nodak.edu/sdc/publications/communityreadiness/2006follow-up/CAR_Adult_FINAL.pdf

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NGO and Other Countries:

Australia:

1. Bureau of Statistics, Various:

A. Causes of Death, Australia, 2006 (March 2008, Microsoft Excel format).

http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/mediareleasesbyCatalogue/E01388F88ED706B3CA25740B00179673?OpenDocument

Click on "Details" for link to tables.

B. "ABS Causes of Death Statistics: Concepts, Sources and Methods, 2006" (March 2008).

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/3317.0.55.002?OpenDocument

C. "Perspectives on Migrants, 2007" (February 2008).

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/3416.0?OpenDocument

D. "Schools, Australia, 2007" (February 2008, .pdf format, 50p.).

http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4221.02007?OpenDocument

E. "Population Concepts Australia: 2008" (Information Paper, .pdf format, 29p.).

http://www.ausstats.abs.gov.au/ausstats/subscriber.nsf/0/135BECA68EE60F52CA257409000F5C7C/$File/3107055006_2008.pdf

F. Canadian Social Trends (March 2008, HTML and .pdf format).

http://www.statcan.ca/english/freepub/11-008-XIE/11-008-XIE2008001.htm

2. Queensland Government Report: "Gender in Queensland (Census 2006 Bulletin no. 1)" (March 2008, .pdf format, 7p.).

http://www.oesr.qld.gov.au/queensland-by-theme/demography/population-characteristics/bulletins/gender-qld-c06/index.shtml

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Canada:

Statistics Canada/Statistique Canada Report: "Sexual orientation and victimization, 2004," by Diane Beauchamp (February 2008, 14p.).

http://www.statcan.ca/english/research/85F0033MIE/85F0033MIE2008016.htm

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Finland:

Statistics Finland News Release: "Discontinuation of education increased most in polytechnic education" (Mar. 11, 2008).

http://www.stat.fi/til/kkesk/2006/kkesk_2006_2008-03-11_tie_001_en.html

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Iceland:

Statistics Iceland News Release: "Population by country of birth and citizenship 1 January 2008" (No. 36/2008, Mar. 11, 2008). There is a link to relevant statistics at the bottom of the news release .

http://www.statice.is/Pages/444?NewsID=2966

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Israel:

Central Statistics Bureau Report: "Population of localities - 30.12.2007 (provisional data)" (March 2008, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format). Note: the below listed page is in Hebrew, the tables are in Hebrew and English. Click on the Hebrew titles for links to .pdfs. Click on Excel icons for links to spreadsheets.

http://www1.cbs.gov.il/www/population/popul_new.htm

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Macao:

Statistics and Census Bureau Periodical: Monthly Bulletin of Statistics (February 2008, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format, 79p.).

http://www.dsec.gov.mo/e_index.asp?src=/english/pub/e_bme_pub.html

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Norway:

Statistics Norway News Releases:

A. "Children in kindergartens. Preliminary figures, 2007" (Mar. 14, 2008). The news release links to four topical tables.

http://www.ssb.no/english/subjects/04/02/10/barnehager_en/

B. "Imprisonment, 2006" (Mar. 14, 2008).

http://www.ssb.no/english/subjects/03/05/fengsling_en/

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Philippines:

National Statistics Office News Releases:

A. "Foreign Marriage Statistics: 2004" (Mar. 8, 2008).

http://www.census.gov.ph/data/sectordata/sr08325tx.html

B. "Fetal Death Statistics: 2004" (Mar. 13, 2008).

http://www.census.gov.ph/data/sectordata/sr08301tx.html

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Poland:

Central Statistical Office Compendium: Basic urban statistics 2005 -- 2006 (March 2008, .pdf and .zip compressed .pdf format, 716p.). The compendium is in Polish and English.

http://www.stat.gov.pl/gus/45_731_ENG_HTML.htm

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Romania:

National Institute of Statistics Periodical: Monthly Statistical Bulletin: 1/2008 (March 2008, .pdf format, 199p.).

http://www.insse.ro/cms/rw/pages/index.en.do

Click on the title page icon below the title for link to full text.

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Scotland:

General Register Office Report: "2007 Preliminary Return" (March 2008, .pdf, Microsoft Excel, and comma separated value [.csv] format).

http://www.gro-scotland.gov.uk/statistics/publications-and-data/preliminary-return/2007-preliminary-return.html

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Switzerland:

Federal Statistical Office Compendium: Statistical Data on Switzerland: 2008 (March 2008, .pdf format, 49p.).

http://www.bfs.admin.ch/bfs/portal/en/index/news/publikationen.html?publicationID=3107

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Ukraine:

State Statistics Committee Report: "Population: 1990-2007) (March 2008).

http://www.ukrstat.gov.ua/operativ/operativ2007/ds/nas_rik/nas_e/nas_rik_e.html

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UK:

HM Treasury Report: "Ending child poverty: everybody´s business," (March 2008, .pdf format, 82p.).

http://www.hm-treasury.gov.uk/budget/budget_08/documents/bud_bud08_child.cfm

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OTHER REPORTS, ARTICLES, ETC.:

Demographic Research Articles:

A. "Perturbation analysis of nonlinear matrix population models," by Hal Caswell (Vol. 18, Article 13, March 2008, .pdf format, p. 59-116).

http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol18/3/default.htm

B. "How fertility and union stability interact in shaping new family patterns in Italy and Spain," by Mariachiara Di Cesare and Lucia Coppola (Vol. 18, Article 14, March 2008, .pdf format, p. 117-144).

http://www.demographic-research.org/Volumes/Vol18/4/default.htm

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National Research Council Monograph: Biosocial Surveys, edited by Maxine Weinstein, James W. Vaupel, and Kenneth W. Wachter (2007, OpenBook format, 414p.). Pricing information for a print or .pdf copy is available at the site.

http://books.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=11939

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WORKING PAPERS:

University Of Wisconsin Institute For Research On Poverty: "Childlessness and the Economic Well-Being of Elders," by Robert D. Plotnick (Discussion Paper No. 1336-08, March 2008, .pdf format, 33p.).

Abstract:

Using the Health and Retirement Survey, this study examines the relationship between childlessness and four indicators of elders’ economic well-being: income, receipt of disability and income-tested benefits, and wealth. The study estimates separate models for currently married persons, currently single women, and currently single men using standard OLS and logit, quantile regression, linear and logit random effects, and two propensity score models. Compared to married parents, childless married couples tend to have slightly more income and about 5 percent more wealth. Unmarried childless men enjoy no income advantage over unmarried fathers, but have 24-35 percent more wealth. Childlessness has the strongest relationship with unmarried women’s economic well-being. Compared to elderly unmarried mothers, unmarried childless women have, on average, 13-31 percent more income and about 35 percent more wealth. The strength of these relationships tends to increase as one moves up the distribution of income or wealth, especially for unmarried women. Childless unmarried men are more likely to use income-tested benefits while childless unmarried women are less likely to do so.

http://www.irp.wisc.edu/publications/dps/pdfs/dp133608.pdf

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Population Council: "Fertility transitions in developing countries: Progress or stagnation?" by John Bongaarts (Poverty, Gender, and Youth Working Paper no. 7, 2008, .pdf format, 15p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://www.popcouncil.org/publications/wp/pgy/007.html

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Urban Institute:

A. "School Segregation Under Color-Blind Jurisprudence: The Case of North Carolina," by Charles Clotfelter, Helen Ladd, and Jacob Vigdor (Working Paper No. 16, February 2008, .pdf format, 48p.). Links to the abstract and full-text can be found at:

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=1001152

B. "Public School Choice and Integration Evidence from Durham, North Carolina," by Robert Bifulco, Helen Ladd, and Stephen L. Ross (Working Paper No. 14, February 2008, .pdf format, 48p.). Links to the abstract and full-text can be found at:

http://www.urban.org/url.cfm?ID=1001151

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Center for Research on Child Wellbeing (Princeton University):

A. "Family Structure and Income Volatility: Association with Food Stamp Program Participation," by Daphne Hernandez and Kathleen Ziol-Guest (Working Paper 2008-06-FF, March 2008, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

Using the Fragile Families and Child Well-Being Study, this paper investigates how income volatility and union stability and transitions influence patterns in Food Stamp Program (FSP) participation among a sample of young families (n=1263). Multinomial logistic regression models suggest that families that experience significant declines in income are related to constant and transitional participation. Families that stay married are more likely not to participate, while other stable unions (e.g., stably cohabitating couples and stably singles) and unions in transition are associated with always participating. We also found immigration status, health, public agency support, public health insurance, and housing assistance from the government or friends/family, to be significant in predicting participation. Strategies to increase participation are discussed.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP08-06-FF.pdf

B. "Unwed Mothers’ Private Safety Nets and Children’s Socioemotional Wellbeing," by Rebecca Ryan, Ariel Kalil, and Lindsay Leininger (Working Paper 2008-05-FF, March 2008, .pdf format, 37p.).

Abstract:

Using longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 1,162) and the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (N = 1,308), we estimate associations between material and instrumental support available to unwed, low-income mothers and young children‘s socioemotional wellbeing. In multivariate OLS models, we find mothers‘ available support is negatively associated with children‘s behavior problems and positively associated with prosocial behavior in both datasets; associations between available support and children‘s internalizing and prosocial behaviors attenuate but remain robust in residualized change models. Overall, results support the hypothesis that the availability of a private safety net is positively associated with children‘s socioemotional adjustment.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP08-05-FF.pdf

C. "Fragile Families and the Reproduction of Poverty," by Sara McLanahan (Working Paper 2008-04-FF, March 2008, .pdf format, 44p.).

Abstract:

In 1965, Daniel Patrick Moynihan warned that non-marital childbearing and marital dissolution were undermining the progress of African Americans. I argue that what Moynihan identified as a race-specific problem in the 1960s has now become a classbased phenomena as well. Using data from a new birth cohort study, I show that unmarried parents come from much more disadvantaged populations than married parents. I further argue that non-marital childbearing reproduces class and racial disparities through its association with partnership instability and multi-partnered fertility. These processes increase in maternal stress and mental health problems, reduce the quality of mothers' parenting, reduce paternal investments, and ultimately lead to poor outcomes in children. Finally, by spreading fathers‘ contributions across multiple households, partnership instability and multi-partnered fertility undermine the importance of individual fathers‘ contributions of time and money which is likely to affect the future marriage expectations of both sons and daughters.

http://crcw.princeton.edu/workingpapers/WP08-04-FF.pdf

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Center for Population Dynamics [Arizona State University]: "Sexual Frequency and the Stability of Marital and Cohabiting Unions," by Scott T. Yabiku and Constance T. Gager (CePoD Working Paper No. 08-101, January 2008, .pdf format, 29p.).

Abstract:

Prior research on marriage shows that lower sexual frequency or lower sexual satisfaction is associated with higher rates of divorce. Scant research, however, has addressed the role of sexual activity in the dissolution of cohabiting unions. Researchers have shown that marriage and cohabitation are different institutional family forms. Thus, there are good reasons to expect that the link between sexual activity and stability will differ across marriage and cohabitation. We draw upon social exchange theory to develop our hypotheses. Our theoretical framework proposes several reasons why sexual frequency is more important in cohabitation: (1) cohabitors’ lower costs of finding sexual alternatives, (2) cohabitors’ lower barriers of ending the relationship in the form of union-specific economic and non-economic capital, and (3) cohabitors’ higher demands for sexual activity. In other words, sexuality occupies a more prominent role in cohabitation than marriage, and low sexual frequency within cohabitation is more likely to lead to dissolution. Using the National Survey of Families and Households (NSFH) and discrete-time event history models, we examine the relationships between sexual frequency and union dissolution. Results indicate that low sexual frequency is associated with significantly higher rates of union dissolution among cohabitors than married couples.

http://www.asu.edu/clas/ssfd/cepod/working/2008_101.pdf

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Institute of Behavioral Science (University of Colorado-Boulder):

A. "Inter-Neighborhood Migration, Race, And Environmental Hazards: Modeling Micro-Level Processes Of Environmental Inequality," by Kyle Crowder and Liam C. Downey (POP2008-02, February 2008, .pdf format, 38p.).

Abstract:

This study combines individual-level data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics with neighborhood level environmental hazard data derived from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Toxic Release Inventory to provide the first empirical examination of racial and ethnic differences in migration between neighborhoods with varying levels of environmental pollution. Results indicate that profound racial and ethnic differences in exposure to industrial pollution are maintained more by differences in mobility destinations than by differential effects of pollution on the decision to move. Conditional upon moving, black and Latino householders enter neighborhoods that are significantly more polluted than those accessed by whites, while other-race householders enter neighborhoods with less pollution. These differences cannot be explained by group differences in socioeconomic resources or other micro-level characteristics but are shaped, in part, by group differences in the reaction to non-white populations that tend to be concentrated in highly polluted areas.

http://www.colorado.edu/ibs/pubs/pop/pop2008-0002.pdf

B. "Repairing the Migration Data Reported by the American Community Survey," by Andrei Rogers, Bryan Jones, and Wanran Ma (POP2008-02, February 2008, .pdf format, 40p.).

http://www.colorado.edu/ibs/pubs/pop/pop2008-0001.pdf

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Max Plank Institute for Demographic Research:

A. "Optimal semelparity," by James W. Vaupel, Jessica Metcalf, and Trifon I. Missov (WP-2008-012, March 2008, .pdf format, 28p.).

Abstract:

The life history evolution of semelparous species has attracted considerable attention because their life-cycle is so simple. Here, we develop an analytical framework that unifies treatment of the three main axes of life history variation in such species: the optimal timing of reproduction, offspring size, and growth-survival trade-offs. We outline how predicted patterns of optimal life-histories relate to empirical examples. Our model provides insights into how demographic schedules shape optimal life histories, opening the way for understanding the additional modulating effects of genetic heterogeneity and environmental stochasticity on demographic trajectories.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2008-012.pdf

B. "Beyond the Kannisto-Thatcher Database on Old Age Mortality: an assessment of data quality at advanced ages," by Dmitri A. Jdanov, Domantas Jasilionis, Eugeny Soroko, Roland Rau, and James W. Vaupel (WP-2008-013, March 2008, .pdf format, 55p.).

Abstract:

The old age population in developed countries has been increasing remarkably, yet internationally comparable high quality data on oldest-old mortality remain relatively scarce. The Kannisto-Thatcher Old Age Mortality Database (KTD) is a unique source providing uniformly recalculated old-age mortality data for 35 countries. Our study addresses a number of data quality issues relevant to population and death statistics at the most advanced ages. Following previous studies by Väinö Kannisto, we apply the same set of measures. This allows us to identify dubious or irregular mortality patterns. Deviations such as this often suggest that the data quality has serious problems. We update previously published findings by extending the analyses made so far to thirty five countries and by adding data on longer historical periods. In addition, we propose a systematic classification of country- and period-specific data, thus simultaneously accounting for each indicator of data quality. We apply conventional procedures of hierarchical cluster analysis to distinguish four data quality clusters (best data quality, acceptable data quality, conditionally acceptable quality, and weak quality). We show that the reliability of old-age mortality estimates has been improving in time. However, the mortality indicators for the most advanced ages of a number of countries, such as Chile, Canada, and the USA should be treated with caution even for the most recent decade. Canada, Ireland, Finland, Lithuania, New Zealand (Non-Maori), Norway, Portugal, Spain, and the USA have particular problems in their historical data series. After having compared the KTD with official data, we conclude that the methods used for extinct and almost extinct generations produce more accurate population estimates than those published by national statistical offices. The most reliable official data come from the countries with fully functioning population registers.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2008-013.pdf

C. "Regularities and deviations in mortality trends of the developed world," by Elsabetta Barbi (WP-2008-014, March 2008, .pdf format, 10p.).

Abstract:

By the second half of the 20th century, mortality patterns in industrialized countries showed a continuous tendency of reduction at all ages, even at the oldest ones. However, the pace of mortality decline considerably varies depending on the country. Furthermore, in a few cases, stagnation and even an unexpected reversed pattern have been observed in more recent years. In this paper a comparative analysis of mortality trends in several developed countries is performed. The aim of the paper is to locate deviations from expected mortality patterns, and to understand the reasons for these deviations. As a first step of the analysis, a new two-dimensional relational model is applied to mortality surfaces of the selected developed countries, between 1960 and 1999, for the age range 50-99. In the second step, mortality by cause of the countries with particular structural features is analyzed through the surfaces of leading causes of death.

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/papers/working/wp-2008-014.pdf

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Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research: MPIDR has added several miscellaneous working papers from various institutions to its "Other Working Papers" site. Links to abstracts and full text are available at:

http://www.demogr.mpg.de/en/publications/other.htm

From V. Agadjanian through R.D. Scholz and A. Schulz, all dated 2007

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World Bank Policy Research Programme: "Social exclusion and the gender gap in education," by Maureen Lewis and Marlaine Lockheed (WPS 4562, March 2008, ASCII text and .pdf format, 38p.). Links to an abstract and full text are available at:

http://econ.worldbank.org/external/default/main?pagePK=64165259&theSitePK=469382&piPK=64165421&menuPK=64166093&entityID=000158349_20080318104842

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Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) [University of Bonn, Germany]: "Prison Conditions and Recidivism," by Francesco Drago, Roberto Galbiati, and Pietro Vertova (Discussion Paper 3395, March 2008, .pdf format, 26p.).

Abstract:

We use a unique data set on post-release behavior of former Italian inmates to estimate the effect of prison conditions on recidivism. By combining different sources of data we exploit variation in prison conditions measured by: 1) the extent of overcrowding at the prison level, 2) the number of deaths in the facility of detention during an inmate’s stay and 3) the distance of the prison from the chief town of the province where the prison is located. By considering inmates who served their sentence in a jurisdiction different from the hometown in which they live after release, we can include province of residence fixed effects and account for the main source of unobserved heterogeneity correlated to prison conditions. We find that a harsher prison treatment does not reduce former inmates’ criminal activity. The extent of overcrowding and the number of deaths do not decrease the probability to be re-arrested. Instead, we find evidence that the degree of isolation measured by distance from the prison of detention to the chief town of the province where the prison is located increases recidivism.

http://ftp.iza.org/dp3395.pdf

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Institute for Social and Economic Research (ISER) [University of Essex, Colchester, UK]: "Why Educated Mothers don’t Make Educated Children? A Statistical Study in the Intergenerational Transmission of Schooling," by Chiara Pronzato (ISER Working Paper No. 2008-11, March 2008, .pdf format, 24p.).

Abstract:

More educated parents are observed to have better educated children. From a policy point of view, however, it is important to distinguish between causation and simple selection. Researchers trying to control for unobserved ability have found conflicting results: in most cases, they have found a strong positive paternal effect but a negligible maternal effect. In this paper, I evaluate the impact on the robustness of the estimates of the characteristics of the samples commonly used in this strand of research: samples of small size, with low variability in parental education, not randomly selected from the population.

http://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/pubs/workpaps/pdf/2008-11.pdf

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Centre d'Etudes de Populations, de Pauvret et de Politiques Socio-Economiques/ International Networks for Studies in Technology, Environment, Alternatives, Development--Integrated Research Infrastructure in the Socio-economic Sciences (CEPS/INSTEAD--IRISS) [Luxembourg]: "What's a university worth? Changes in the lifestyle and status of post-2000 European Graduates," by Simona Vasilache and Michaela Cornelia Prejmerean (IRISS Working Paper No. 2008-05, February 2008, .pdf format, 34p.).

Abstract:

The paper is structured in two main chapters, the first presenting a literature review on lifestyle, underlining the main themes approached in recent scientific papers, and conducting factorial analysis as to discriminate the most relevant research directions, and the second dedicated to studying, on the data provided by the European Social Survey, the lifestyle patterns of post-2000 European graduates. The methodological perspective included probit regression and log-linear models, as well as cluster analysis. The main results refer to testing the concept of lifestyle calibration, that we proposed in the paper, on the selected population of young European graduates. A total of four groups, two exhibiting a good lifestyle calibration, and the other two a poor lifestyle calibration, were obtained. Each family of two groups constitutes a lifestyle type, which is characterized in the paper according to values-behaviours coordination, time allocation and its relation to life satisfaction, defined as an estimator of lifestyle calibration. The conclusions include discussions on the inclusion and exclusion of the European graduates population from these groups, which resulted from our analysis.

http://www.ceps.lu/pdf/11/art1332.pdf?CFID=135426&CFTOKEN=34629003

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JOURNAL TABLES OF CONTENTS (check your library for availability):

Child Neglect and Abuse (Vol. 32, No. 2, February 2008).

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/01452134

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CONFERENCES:

US National Center for Education Statistics, Institute of Education Sciences: "Using NAEP for Research and Policy Analysis," (July 30 - August 1, 2008, Washington, DC).

http://ies.ed.gov/whatsnew/conferences/?id=313&cid=2

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International Association for Official Statistics Conference Call for Papers: The conference will be held Oct. 14-16, 2008, in Shanghai, China. For more information see:

http://www.iaos2008conf.cn/

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES:

AgeWork.com: AgeWork has updated its employment page with listings through Mar. 16, 2008.

http://agework.geron.org/c/search_results.cfm?site_id=312

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Chronicle of Higher Education:

Sociology positions has been updated through Mar. 11, 2008

http://chronicle.com/jobs/100/800/8000/

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LEGISLATION INFORMATION UPDATES:

US House Committee on Education and Labor, Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education Hearing Testimony: "After School Programs: How the Bush Administration’s Budget Impacts Children and Families," a hearing held March 11, 2008 (.pdf format).

http://edworkforce.house.gov/hearings/ecese-2008-03-11.shtml

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DATA:

Australian Bureau of Statistics:

A. "Multi-Purpose Household Survey, Expanded Confidentialised Unit Record File, Technical Manual, 2006-07" (February 2008, .pdf and Microsoft Excel format, 23p.).

http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/4100.02006-07?OpenDocument

Click on "Details".

B. "Multi-Purpose Household Survey, Australia, Expanded Confidentialised Unit Record File, 2006-07" (February 2008).

http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/4100.0.55.001?OpenDocument

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UK Data Archive (Essex University, Colchester, UK): The UK Data Archive has recently added the following datasets to its holdings. Note: There maybe charges or licensing requirements on holdings of the UK Data Archive. For more information see:

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/

SN 5759 -Making Numeracy Teaching Meaningful to Adult Learners, 2002-2004

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5759

SN 5281 -Improving the Effectiveness of Pupil Group Work in Primary and Secondary Schools, 2002-2004

http://www.data-archive.ac.uk/findingData/snDescription.asp?sn=5281

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